Doctoral grads in cap and gown

EdD Advancement to Candidacy

EdD in Educational Leadership: Advancement to Candidacy

 

The Advancement to Candidacy process is intended to assess the doctoral student’s preparedness to design and conduct a research project that contributes to the professional field’s understanding of the practice of educational leadership. Once the following requirements are completed, a student is (self)identified as a Candidate for the Degree of Doctor of Education.

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Requirements

The Advancement to Candidacy process is intended to assess the doctoral student’s preparedness to design and conduct a research project that contributes to the professional field’s understanding of the practice of educational leadership. Once the following requirements are completed, a student is (self)identified as a Candidate for the Degree of Doctor of Education.

 

Coursework
 
Successful completion of two-thirds of the doctoral coursework (not inclusive of transfer credits). “Successful completion” shall be defined as earning a minimum grade point average of 3.25 out of a possible 4.0 GPA.
 
 
Self-Assessment (ePortfolio)

 

An electronic portfolio (ePortfolio) is a self-assessment that calls upon students to reflect upon and demonstrate knowledge and application of content and skills reflected in program themes.  Students will begin developing an ePortfolio during the first academic year using Digication, the college’s platform for portfolio development. The ePortfolio will include evidence of one's learning and growth, e.g., leadership philosophy statement, epistemological and methodological development, and Capstone project.

 

Review of the ePortfolio will occur annually, with first year reflection due by end of year one (as part of EDAD 8170: Capstone 1); and final submission of ePortfolio will be by the beginning of the third year of coursework (as part of EDAD 8171: Capstone 2).

 

At the end of a student's first year of coursework, each must submit a reflection on what has been learned, through the coursework, about self, and about leadership. Each student must submit the reflection essay to one's advisor and Program Director, and upload a final copy of the essay to the ePortfolio as part of course requirements in EDAD 8170 (Capstone 1). The prompt for this reflection is available HERE.

 

 
Successful Defense of Dissertation Proposal

 

The final requirement for Advancement to Candidacy shall be the formal acceptance by the student’s faculty dissertation committee of the written dissertation proposal, following defense of proposal. This typically occurs at the end of the second year of coursework. During the student’s first year of coursework, s/he will write a 3-5 page research prospectus which is presented to one of the core faculty members as an invitation to serve as chair of the dissertation committee.
 
The student shall consult with the dissertation committee chair to determine who will be invited to serve as second and third members. It is understood that both the student and chair may choose to veto the nomination of the second and third members. With the committee membership determined, the student will draft and defend a full research proposal. The proposal shall be defined as follows for each dissertation format option:

 

  • In a five chapter dissertation: Chapter 1: Introduction; Chapter 2: Review of the Literature; Chapter 3: Research Methodology

  • In the three article dissertation: Chapter 1: Introduction; Review of the Literature as publishable article; with proposed Research Design (consistent with requirements for IRB application).

 

 
Student Responsibility During the Dissertation Phase of the Program
 
The EdD dissertation is an exercise in the student’s independent application of theory to a problem of practice. In sharp contrast to the doctoral coursework phase of the program where the professor takes the lead responsibility for teaching a course, in the dissertation phase the professor assumes the role of counselor or tutor, asking questions of the student rather than providing direct guidance about how to conceptualize and conduct the study.
 
Once the dissertation proposal development phase of the program begins and continuing through to the final oral defense of the completed dissertation, the doctoral student shall assume lead responsibility for conceptualizing the study, designing its methodology, conducting the research, preparing the remaining dissertation chapters, and (in consultation with the dissertation chair) scheduling the final defense. In the event that a student fails to show evidence of assuming lead responsibility in either the proposal development or research phases of the dissertation requirement, a majority of the dissertation committee members may determine that the student does not possess the skills to complete the dissertation and may counsel the student to withdraw from the program.

Successful final defense of the completed dissertation affirms the student’s competence as a scholar-practitioner.

 
Adopted: July 2013
Revised: August 2015
Revised: June 2018

 

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