SUMMER TERM

Manhattanville College Summer Courses

Courses for college students and talented high school students.

Many online options available.

For full details on classes, visit https://servicehub.mville.edu/Student/Courses/Search and choose the Summer I and/or Summer 2 terms.

Tuition is set at $900 per credit for part-time students.  For Manhattanville students who register for summer courses, a 30% discount is applied.

High school students taking summer classes are billed at $150 per credit

Registration for summer courses can be done via Student Planning for those with access.  For all other prospective students, please contact Academic.Advising@mville.edu for help.

 

 

Summer I: June 1, 2021 through July 2, 2021

ACC 1002: Fundamentals of Accounting I (3 credits)

Introduction to accounting concepts for external financial reporting. Topics include accounting theories and principles relative to asset and liability valuations and income determination.

Tuesdays, 5:45-9:50, Online

 

ART 4003: Painting* (3 credits)

Offered for all levels, beginners to advanced. The course emphasizes each student's unique potential while exploring a variety of concepts and techniques. Representational and abstract forms are explored utilizing still life, the human figure, and other sources of visual expression. The student may choose to use either acrylic or oil paints. Three required hours of lab time per week.

Mondays, Thursdays, 4:15-8:15, Online

 

BIO-1001 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I (4 Credits)

The first part of a two-semester lecture sequence, complemented with hands-on laboratory experience, stresses the major biological principles and concepts that serve as the foundation for study in the biological and health-related fields. Although the first semester includes topics such as the chemistry of biological systems, cell and historical organization, membrane transport, metabolism and evolution of organisms, the major focus is on the principles of Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. The second semester stresses animal and plant organization, development, and physiology. Laboratory sessions provide opportunities for students to gain technical experience and to improve laboratory-related writing skills. Prerequisite: BIO.1000 w/ a minimum grade of C- or passing score on placement exam. Must be completed prior to taking this course.

Online asynchronous

 

BIO-1014 CONTEMPORARY NUTRITION (3 Credits)

This online course is designed to address the principles and practical aspects of nutrition. The physiological importance of diet, including the role of energy yielding nutrients, vitamins and minerals, as well as fitness and exercise are discussed to allow the student to comprehend the importance of good nutrition for a healthy lifestyle. Further, the course will place emphasis on self-assessment, current food movements, the evaluation of current and future nutrition needs (such as during pregnancy), and the effects of poor nutrition to engage the student's role in enforcing a healthy lifestyle.

Online asynchronous

 

BIO-2003 PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS (3 Credits)

This course is designed to provide the student with a qualitative introduction to the field of genetics. This one semester course will focus on the basic principles of genetics, such as the role of DNA and RNA in gene expression and protein synthesis, Mendelian genetics, the role of genetics in animal development, and population and evolutionary genetics. To engage students, lecture material will be reinforced through practical applications within the laboratory setting. The lectures and laboratory assignments will leave the student with an operational knowledge of modern day genetics and an ability to communicate the material in a scientific manner.

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 1:00-4:35, Online

 

BIO-3007 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (4 Credits)

This first course of a two-course series introduces various processes and activities of the human body. Subject matter includes physical and chemical properties of life, cell membrane theory, organization of tissues, skeletal and muscular systems, nervous system organization and control, and special senses. Laboratory work includes systematic coverage of human anatomy, cat dissections, and relevant physiological experiments. Students may take this class as one of their required laboratory classes, but need to take both BIO.3007 and BIO.3017 to fulfill graduate and medical school prerequisites.

Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II with grade of C or better. Must be completed prior to taking this course. Principles of Chemistry I and II (with Lab) with grade of C- or better. Must be completed prior to taking this course.

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10:00-1:35, Online

 

CAM 3015: Global Media (3 credits)

This course examines media in a global context. It investigates the role of media in a global world by exploring theories, industry structures, government regulations, and media ethics. Additionally, it engages with media from around the world including film, music, video games, online videos, social media, and television programs.

Online asynchronous

 

CHM-1001 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY I (3 Credits)

Topics include Matter and Measurements; Atoms, Molecules, and Ions; Mass Relations in Chemistry; Stoichiometry; Reactions in Aqueous Solution; Gases; Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table; Covalent Bonding; Thermochemistry; Liquids and Solids; and Solutions. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the Chemistry Placement Exam or a minimum grade of C- in CHM 1000. Corequisite: CHM 1003, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. Note: This course is intended for Science majors and Pre-health students. It must be taken with CHM 1003 in order to fulfill a Scientific General Education requirement.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 1:00-3:40, Online

 

CHM-1003 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY LAB I* (1 Credit)

This course presents laboratory techniques and experimental methods that demonstrate the principles studied in CHM 1001. Corequisite: CHM 1001, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. Note: This course must be taken with CHM 1001 in order to fulfill a Scientific General Education requirement.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10:00-12:40, Hybrid

 

CHM-2001 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (3 Credits)

This course is a study of the major classes of organic compounds, designed to provide students with the background in organic chemistry needed for advanced study in chemistry and the life sciences. Topics include structure and bonding; polar covalent bonds; acid and base reactions; alkanes; cycloalkanes; stereochemistry; overview of chemical reactions; alkenes: structure and reactivity; alkenes: reactions and synthesis; alkynes: introduction to organic synthesis; organohalides; and nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 1002. Corequisite: CHM.2005 - Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10:00-12:40, Online

 

CHM-2005 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LAB (1 Credit)

This course applies laboratory techniques and experimental methods to the topics and reactions studied in CHM 2001. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 1002 and in CHM 1004. Corequisite: CHM.2001 - Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Section 01*: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 1:00-4:00, In-person

Section 02: Online asynchronous

 

HIS 1013: Treasures, Myths and Mysteries of History (3 credits)

Using artifacts as portals to the past, this course explores monumental events of history from antiquity to recent times and includes enduring myths and intriguing mysteries about them. Coverage of these treasures includes the compelling stories behind them and how they were handed down through the ages to come to their present resting places. The remarkable objects that are the subject of this course are a diverse lot, ranging from heartrending to religious, from military to romantic, and revolve around not just significant events of the past but obscure (but important) ones also. The course is based on the instructor's books Lucy's Bones, Sacred Stones and Einstein's Brain and Jumbo's Hide, Elvis's Ride, and the Tooth of Buddha, which were both adapted for the History Channel series, History's Lost and Found.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 1:00-3:20, Online

 

MATH 1030: Calculus I (4 credits)

Topics in this course will include functions, limits, and continuity; derivatives of polynomials, products, quotients, trigonometric, and implicit functions; applications to related rates, maximum-minimum problems and graphing; anti-derivatives, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area problems. A computer symbolic algebra component is included.

Online asynchronous

 

MGT 2008: Corporations in Society (3 credits)

This course explores the interactions of corporations in society, with particular attention given to the corporation-government interface. Students will explore the various stakeholder groups to which corporations are accountable, and the rights of each of these groups. Additional topics include business ethics and effective strategies for managing public policy issues. Prerequisite: MGT 1001: Fundamentals of Management.

Wednesdays, 5:45-9:50

 

SOC 1001: Intro to Sociology (3 credits)

This course provides an overview of the broad scope of the discipline of sociology. Basic concepts and theories will be discussed as students are introduced to the major fields of study within sociology. The sociological perspective, as a useful view of the human condition, will serve as the central theme of the course.

Online asynchronous

 

SPN-1001 INTRODUCTORY SPANISH I (4 Credits)

Beginning course designed primarily to teach the elements of Spanish grammar and language structure through a communicative approach. Emphasis is on building vocabulary and language patterns to encourage spontaneous language use in and out of the classroom. Open to students with no previous training in Spanish and to others on assignment by placement test.

Online asynchronous

 

SPRT-2010 ETHICS IN SPORT (3 Credits)

Contemporary sport practices and organizations are fraught with ethical issues that impact participants, fans, organizers, and very often societies at-large. This course will introduce students to various ethical dilemmas currently being hashed within organized sport settings. Students will critically analyze diverse philosophic arguments and possible solutions related to these debates. Additionally, students will construct an essay of their own, aiming to remedy a contemporary ethical dilemma that interests them. Topics include: promoting competition, instances of cheating, intentional rule violations, running up the score on opponents, using performance enhancing technologies, polices toward sex and gender equity, Native American mascots and team names, the professionalization of big-time college sports, the commercialization of sport, youth sport policies, and permitting violence and health risks in sport.

Online asynchronous

 

Summer 2: July 6, 2021-August 6, 2021

 

ACC 1008: Fundamentals of Accounting II (3 credits)

Introduction to accounting concepts for internal reporting and control. Topics include cash budgeting, decision making, capital budgeting, tax aspects of managerial planning and performance evaluation.

Tuesdays, 5:45-9:50

 

BIO-1002 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II (4 Credits)

The second part of a two-semester lecture sequence, complemented with hands-on laboratory experience, that stresses the major biological principles and concepts that serve as the foundation for study in the biological and health-related fields. The second semester stresses animal and plant organization, development, and physiology. The first semester includes topics such as the chemistry of biological systems, cell and historical organization, membrane transport, metabolism and evolution of organisms; however, the major focus is on the principles of Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. Laboratory sessions provide opportunities for students to gain technical experience and to improve laboratory-related writing skills. Prerequisite: BIO.1001, with a minimum grade of C.

Must be completed prior to taking this course.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 1:00-4:35, Online

 

BIO 1008: Therapeutic Horticulture (3 credits)

This course will explore the significance of the people-plant relationship and the manifestation of its role in the healing process of therapeutic work. Students will experience the healing nature of plants and plant material through participation in class discussion and kinesthetic, horticulture-related activities. Students will have numerous opportunities for the practical application of learned horticultural therapy skills and methodology in activities and projects throughout the course.

Wednesdays, 8:30-12:00, In person

 

BIO-3013 MICROBIOLOGY (4 Credits)

This is an introduction to the morphology and physiology of bacteria and other microorganisms. Laboratory exercises will afford students the opportunity to develop skill in sterile technique and in various practices designed to study the morphology, physiology and practical value of nonpathogenic microorganisms. Human infectious disease such as AIDS is discussed. Graduate level version of this course is available.  Prerequisites: BIO.1001 and BIO.1002 with a minimum grade of C; CHM.1001, CHM.1002, CHM.1003 and CHM.1004 with minimum grades of C-. Must be completed prior to taking this course.

Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1:00-4:35, Online

 

BIO-3017 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (4 Credits)

This course is a continuation of BIO.3007, and will explore the remaining systems of the body. Subject matter includes blood and the cardiovascular system, endocrine system, lymphatic system and immune defenses, respiration, digestion and metabolism, urinary system and reproduction. As with the first course, laboratory work includes systematic coverage of human anatomy, cat dissections, and relevant physiological experiments. Prerequisites: Human Anatomy and Physiology I, with a minimum grade of C-Must be completed prior to taking this course.

Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 8:30-12:35, Online

 

 

CAM-3100 QUEER GAME STUDIES (3 Credits)

Queer game studies questions the binaries that structure our understandings of play, community, production, and culture. In this course, we investigate new ways of understanding, making, and playing games. While we explore the history of LGBTQ representation in games, our investigation goes deeper to consider the role of the body in play, queer conceptions of time and space, and inclusive fan/community practices.

Online asynchronous

 

CAM 3040: Broadcasting and Podcasting (3 credits)

This course will allow students to develop content for television production and audio podcasting. Students will learn effective communication skills through the development of recorded audio. Working in groups, students will write, produce, act as talent and gain a basic understanding of live television production. Students will leave this course with a completed podcast episode and a television episode consisting of various student segments tied together by a host or anchor.

Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 1:00-3:40, In person

 

 

CHM-1002 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY II (3 Credits)

Topics include Rate of Reaction; Gaseous Chemical Equilibrium; Acids and Bases; Equilibria in Acid-Base Solutions; Complex ion and Precipitation Equilibria; Spontaneity of Reaction; Electrochemistry; Nuclear Reactions; Complex Ions and Coordination compounds; Chemistry of the Metals and Nonmetals; and Intro to Organic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 1001 and in CHM 1003. Corequisite: CHM 1004, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. Note: This course is intended for Science majors and Pre-health students.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 1:00-3:40, Online

 

CHM-1004 PRINC OF CHEMISTRY LAB II* (1 Credit)

This course presents laboratory techniques and experimental methods that demonstrate the principles studied in CHM 1002. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 1001 and in CHM 1003. Corequisite: CHM 1002, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. Note: This course must be taken with CHM 1002 in order to fulfill a Scientific General Education requirement.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10:00-12:40, Hybrd

 

 

CHM-2002 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (3 Credits)

This course is a study of the major classes of organic compounds, designed to provide students with the background in organic chemistry needed for advanced study in chemistry and the life sciences. Topics include structure determination: mass spectrometry, IR spectroscopy, 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy; conjugated compounds; benzene and aromaticity; electophilic aromatic substitution; alcohols and phenol; ethers, epoxides, thiols and sulfides; carbonyl chemistry; chemistry of aldehydes and ketones; and chemistry of carboxylic acids and nitriles. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 2001. Corequisite: CHM.2006 - Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10:00-12:40, Online

 

CHM-2006 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II* LAB (1 Credit)

This course applies laboratory techniques and experimental methods to the topics and reactions studied in CHM 2002. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 2001 and in CHM 2005. Corequisite: CHM.2002 - Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Section 01*: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 1:00-4:00, In person

Section 02: Online asynchronous

 

MAC 1010: Computer Programming I (4 credits)

This is an introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development as well as Java programming. Object oriented coding, debugging and design are emphasized. Computer Science majors are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course in the first semester of their freshman year, or immediately upon changing major to Computer Science.

Online asynchronous

SPN-1002 INTRODUCTORY SPANISH II (4 Credits)

Continuation of SPN 1001.  Prerequisite: SPN.1001. Must be completed prior to taking this course.

Online asynchronous.