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Courses


Spanish and Portuguese

SPN 1005: Spanish for Beginners I (4 cr.)
Beginning course designed primarily to teach the elements of Spanish grammar and language structure through a communicative approach.  Emphasis is on building vocabulary and language patterns to encourage spontaneous language use in and out of the classroom.  Open to students with no previous training in Spanish and to others on assignment by placement test.  (Fall) (Spring)

SPN 1008: Spanish for Beginners II (4 cr.)
Continuation of SPN 1005.  (Fall) (Spring)

SPN 1010: Portuguese for Beginners I (4 cr.)
This course presents an introduction to the Portuguese language as it is spoken throughout the Portuguese-speaking world. It will cover  basic vocabulary and grammatical construction of the language, as well as pronunciation and idiomatic expressions.  The course is complemented by language lab sessions that are interactive and primarily auditory in nature.  (Fall) (Spring)

SPN 1013: Intermediate Spanish I (3 cr.)
This course reviews the principal elements of Spanish language structure and Hispanic culture, concentrating on fluency and accuracy through listening, speaking, reading, and writing activities.  Prerequisite: SPN 1008.  (Fall) (Spring)

SPN 1014: Intermediate Spanish II (3 cr.)
Reading and discussions of contemporary Hispanic texts and review of the main grammatical concepts of Spanish.  Cultural videos are used in class.  Prerequisite: Intermediate placement or I.  (Fall) (Spring)

SPN 1016: Portuguese for Beginners II (4 cr.)
The continuation of Portuguese for Beginners I, this course further develops the student's ability to communicate in Portuguese with native speakers through the study of current and common everyday situations, illustrated by a variety of short reading selections.  Oral and reading comprehension is a key focus of the lessons and relevant exercises. Current audio-visual materials also complement the language lab. (Fall) (Spring)

Advanced Language and Composition and Introduction to Literary Studies


SPN 2001: Advanced Spanish Grammar Review (3 cr.)
Advanced course designed to further develop language skills through grammar review and analysis of texts relating to Hispanic culture and literature. Prerequisite: SPN 1014. (Fall)

SPN 2009: More Effective Reading in Spanish (3 cr.)
The main objective of this course is to develop reading comprehension techniques and to improve vocabulary related to different areas (legal, medical, financial, arts). The student will read a great variety of texts and will discuss them in class, working in groups and doing all kinds of comprehension exercises. Compositions, text summaries, and class presentations will be part of the course. (Spring)

SPN 2012: Written Contemporary Spanish (3 cr.)
Writing is a major activity in advanced Spanish courses whether it is compositions, book reports, business letters, literary reviews or term papers. This course prepares the student to analyze texts and literary works about social, political and cultural issues, while improving writing skills and acquiring new vocabulary. The aim of the course is to learn how to use skills such as summarizing, comparing, expressing opinions and thoughts on paper in a logical and readable form. (Fall)

SPN 2016: Spanish Creative Writing (3 cr.)
This class is a beginning course in writing for advanced students of Spanish, primarily designed to study the process of storytelling through examining an array of genres, such as fiction for adults and children, biography or journalism, this course explores key components such as language, structure, voice, point of view, and dialogue, in order for students to find and create their own style and voice when writing in Spanish.

SPN 2018: Spanish Translation (3 cr.)
This course is designed for students of advanced levels of Spanish who have a special interest in the craft of translating. The emphasis of this course will be in improving and perfecting their language skills, and will serve as training for future work. The course will explore English to Spanish translation through the study of a variety of texts. Students will learn through practice and discussions in class about their own written translations, analyzing the difficulties of accuracy versus freedom of writing creatively when working as a translator. (Fall)

SPN 2023: Speaking About Movies: Advanced Spanish Conversation (3 cr.)
This course is intended as both a stimulus for conversation among advanced students of Spanish and as an introduction to the world of Spanish and Latin-American film. Thus, rather than a conversation course based on a series of topics of the day, the course supports a language skills course based on a single, consistent subject matter throughout film. The goal is that any student who completes this course will gain a new appreciation of Spanish-language cinema and Hispanic culture while improving conversational skills. For non-native speakers only. Prerequisite: Intermediate I, Intermediate II, or Advanced Spanish Grammar Review. (Fall)

SPN 2024: Spanish for Native and Heritage Speakers I (3 cr.)
Due to the increasing number of native Spanish speaking students enrolled at the college, it is necessary to provide them with the right tools to improve their reading, writing, grammar and vocabulary skills. This course is targeted to those students whose home language is Spanish but whose dominant and school language is English. The goal of this course is to continue expanding their existing skills, both oral and written, in a standard Spanish that is appropriate to professionals and academic settings. The course is presented in a two-semester sequence. Special attention will be placed on writing skills, critical reading, oral presentations, and sophisticated grammatical structures. The course will be taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Students must be natives or heritage speakers of Spanish or have permission of the instructor.

SPN 2025: Spanish for Native and Heritage Speakers II (3 cr.)
Continuation of SPN 2024. (Fall )

SPN 2032: Analysis of Spanish American Literary Texts (3 cr.)
Introduction to literary analysis through close readings of texts from the early to modern periods of Latin American literature to the present. The course engages students in the practice of textual criticism, provides basic theoretical background to develop critical skills and encourages reflection on literature as a system. Prerequisite: Advanced Spanish Review and Written Contemporary Spanish or equivalent and approval by the Director of the Latin American Studies Program. (Fall)

SPN 2035: Spanish for Business and Commercial Practice (3 cr.)
This course provides students with a solid foundation in business vocabulary, basic business and cultural concepts, and situational practice, thereby helping to prepare them for success in today's Spanish-speaking business world. Key unfamiliar business vocabulary and cultural concepts are presented. The business topics reflect the typical curriculum in an American Business School.

SPN 3016: Latin American Civilization in the Arts (3 cr.)
Through the use of audio-visual materials, visits to museums and readings, students explore the development of Latin American civilization through artistic production. The course focuses on the major pre-Columbian civilizations and the legacy of indigenous populations; the period of conquest and the colonial administration for three centuries; the revolutionary period and the efforts made by the different countries in order to assert political independence while resolving present economical problems. The course is structured from an interdisciplinary perspective that emphasizes Latin American art, history, geography and culture. (Fall)

SPN 3020: Spanish Civilization Past and Present (3 cr.)
From a comparative point of view and using literary readings, audiovisual materials and visits to museums, this course explores the historical and cultural development of Spain not as a unity but as a multiplicity of heritages. The first part of the course focuses on modern and contemporary Spain, analyzing the evolution of the political regimes (monarchy, republic, dictatorship) that led to the tragedy of the Civil War, and the new democracy of present day Spain. The second part surveys, from a historicalperspective, some of the major topics of Spanish culture as reflected in the arts. (Spring)

SPN 3044: Advanced Spanish Conversation (3 cr.)
Intensive course in spoken Spanish, designed to give the student fluency in the use of idiomatic everyday language as well as comprehensive, practical vocabulary. It uses a great variety of reading materials as a starting point for conversation and oral presentations in class. For nonnative speakers only. Prerequisite: Intermediate I, Intermediate II, or Advanced Spanish Grammar Review. (Spring)

SPN 3055 Spanish Linguistics for Teachers (3 cr.)
This course, taught entirely in Spanish, addresses areas of Spanish linguistics such as Second Language Acquisition theories, the verbal system, the modal system, semantics and the lexicon, sociolinguistics and bilinguism, and it is aimed to expand and reinforce students existing knowledge of the Spanish language and its cultural/linguistic issues. This course provides a background of concepts and practice of the Spanish language grammatical and semantic concerns that are usually problematic for English speaking teachers, teachers of Hispanic descent, or students aiming to become teachers of Spanish. Prerequisites: Advanced levels of Spanish like SPN 2001, SPN 2009, SPN 2012, SPN 2016, SPN 2018, SPN 2023, SPN 2024, or SPN 2025. (Fall)

Courses in Literature and Culture
The prerequisites for all of these courses are: Analysis of Spanish American Literary Texts, Spanish Civilization Past and Present, and Latin American Civilization in the Arts.

SPN 2040: Spain and Latin America: Literature Nobel Prize Winners (3 cr.)The course introduces eleven master writers in the Hispanic world who were awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. In addition, the course studies the relevance of their works in their cultural, social and political contexts.

SPN 2055: Modern Short Stories from Spain (3 cr.)
This course uses the Hispanic short story to introduce students to the critical skills needed for reading literature in Spanish. Through a varied selection of short stories by writers as Juan Madrid, Soledad Puertolas, Antonio Munoz Molina and Paloma Diaz-Mas, students will compare and contrast themes such as the Spanish social hierarchy, the mysteries of childhood, human psychology and human destiny, among others. The course will stress the plot or the linear progression of the story and will raise analytical questions about the narrative style and message of the short stories. (Spring)

SPN 3010: The Latin American Novel and Film (3 cr.)
This course traces the movement of the contemporary novel away from realism toward self-referentiality. It also studies how literary works are transformed into film, and analyzes the relationship between literature and film. Topics include film adaptations of novels, the cinematic narrative, and the integration of cinematic techniques in the literary text. We analyze screenings of film adaptations. Works by Garcia Marquez, Borges, Cortazar, Rulfo, Paz, Skarmeta, and Franco will be studied.

SPN 3011: The Spanish Golden Age (3 cr.)
This course studies the historical, artistic and literary developments of Spain during the XVI and XVII centuries. We analyze masterpieces of different genres from the comedies of Lope de Vega to the poetry of Quevedo, Gongora and the mystics. Special emphasis will be made on the most important novel of this period, El Quijote, and the other works of Miguel de Cervantes. We will also go a step further and examine the enormous influence of the baroque aesthetic on modern and post-modern authors. (Fall 2011)

SPN 3012: Spanish Literature and Film (3 cr.)
The course considers the complex relationships between film, literature and the arts in XX century Spanish culture. We survey Spanish film from the silent era surrealist masterpieces of Luis Bunuel to the post-modern deconstruction of comedy and melodrama in the works of Pedro Almodovar. Topics include film adaptations of novels and plays, the cinematic narrative of avant-garde authors and the integration of the cinematic apparatus in the text.

SPN 3014: Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Magic Realism Writers (3 cr.)
The course explores the concept of Magic Realism as a narrative tendency in the works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez and other Latin American writers such as Isabel Allende, Miguel Angel Asturias, Alejo Carpentier, Rosario Ferre and Carlos Fuentes.

SPN 3026: The Modern Spanish Novel (3 cr.)
This course surveys some of the most important novels of the XIXth and XXth centuries, from realistic and naturalistic masterpieces of Galdos and Clarin, to the postmodern authors of the recent decades. Each novel will be studied in relation to its historical and cultural background.

SPN 3027: Spanish Women Writers (3 cr.)
The aim of this course is to present the work of some outstanding women writers from Spain from a nontraditional perspective. Carefully selected narratives and poems from these writers allow the student to search for a diversity of voices in the realm of the feminine and the other. Using recent feminist theory we analyze the different discourse that unfolds in their works, opening new meanings in the study of literature.

SPN 3028: Latin American Black Literature (3 cr.)
This course will examine the global vision - cultural, social and aesthetic - of black literature in Latin America presented by writers such as Cirilo Villaverde, Luis Pales Matos, Nicolas Guillen and Alejo Carpentier.

SPN 3029: Latino Communities in New York State (3 cr.)
Latino immigrants reside in both urban and suburban communities throughout New York State. The number of this ethnic minority is growing about four times as fast as the rest of the population. The course will provide an understanding of the Latinos complex social experience in a multi-racial and culturally heterogeneous society. It will focus on specific cultural, economic, social, and political issues concerning the diverse Latino communities living in New York State. (Fall)

SPN 3031: Women's Writings in Latin America (3 cr.)
Through feminist and critical perspectives, this course focuses on a selection of fiction and poetry by outstanding women authors from colonial times to the present. Students will discover the different female worlds in accord with the times their works were written. (Spring)

SPN 3032: Spanish Theatre (3 cr.)
This course examines the development of dramatic genres in Spain from their early manifestations to the present avant-garde experimental plays of authors such as F. G. Lorca and F. Arrabal. We frame the works in their social and historical context, analyzing the evolution in the history of the stage and spectatorship. Visits to a Spanish theatre performance and screenings of films are included.

SPN 3034: Latino Literature in the United States (Taught in English) (3 cr.)
The course focuses on the growing body of literature written by Latinos in recent years. Explores Latino cultural identity through analysis of narrative and poetic works. Guest Latino writers will speak in two of the class sections. (Fall)

SPN 3035: Latin American Modernism (3 cr.)
A view of the genesis, development and characteristics of this literary movement in Latin American letters with special emphasis on its most representative modernista writers: Jose Marti, Ruben Dario, Jose Asuncion Silva, etc.

SPN 3038: Spanish Caribbean Literature (3 cr.)
Texts from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Cuba are studied with special attention to the relevance of these works to their social and political context, and to the region's history of slavery, colonization and decolonization. The course also includes literary works from some regions of Venezuela, Colombia and Panama that share similar aspects of Caribbean culture and history.

SPN 3041: Twentieth Century Spanish Poetry (3 cr.)
This course will be devoted to the study of the major trends of Spanish poetry from the romantic period of the XIXth century to the recent generation of Spanish poets. Special emphasis will be given to the surrealist movement and the poets of the 1927 Generation. Their major works will be analyzed in relation to the cultural environment in which they were created. The course also provides the theoretical background with which to interpret the poems and their intertextuality in light of the aesthetics of modernity. (Fall)

SPN 3042: Twentieth Century Latin American Poetry (3 cr.)
This course analyzes the development of this genre from modernism in the XIXth century to anti-poesia and more recent generations of Latin American poets. Special interest will be given to Avant-garde movements and the most contemporary poetry. The course integrates the analysis of rhetorical and expressive devices and points to the aesthetical intertextuality among different currents. Included are works by Dario, Huidobro, Mistral, Agustini, Vallejo, Paz and Parra, Neruda and Mutis. (Spring)

SPN 3046: Cuban Literature and Film
This course considers how literary works are transformed into films, analyzing the complicated relationships between films, literature, and social conditions in XX century Cuban culture. Topics include films adaptations of novels and plays, the cinematic narrative, and the integration of cinematic techniques in the literary texts. Works by Alejo Carpentier, Senel Paz, Edmundo Desnoes and filmmakers as Humberto Solas and Tomas Gutierrez Alea will be studied. The course will be taught in Spanish. (Spring)

SPN 3048: The Argentine Gaucho: The Man and the Myth (3 cr.)
This course, taught entirely in Spanish, is designed to give students an understanding and appreciation for one of the most unique icons in literary history, the onetime master of the Argentine Pampa - the gaucho. This much misunderstood figure, a kind of John Wayne of the South-American plains that stretched from Buenos Aires into Uruguay, played an important role in Argentine and Latin American history, but has also become the stuff of legend, appearing, one way or another, in a great deal o fLatin American literature. He is therefore important both as a historical and a cultural figure. Through their readings of drama and poetry featuring the gaucho, students will have a chance to hone their interpretive skills, while also being exposed to a wealth of new Spanish vocabulary, which they will use in oral presentations and writing assignments. (Spring)

SPN 3051: Latin American Identity: History and Culture through Songs
(3 cr.)
Throughout history, music has served as a vehicle to communicate feelings and to describe the most important historical events of a given society. This course will look at cultural themes and at certain contemporary historical events in Latin America and for Latinos living in the U.S.A. Students will discover the connection between history, culture, and music in the region. (Spring)

SPN 3998: Senior Evaluation (3 cr.)
For graduating seniors only. A thesis, written in Spanish, is required on a cultural or literary topic approved by the Spanish Department. (Fall) (Spring)

SPN 4495: Independent Study (3 cr.)
Prerequisite: for majors only with permission of the department. (Fall) (Spring)


LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

LAS 2032: Analysis of Latin American Literary Texts (3 cr.)
Introduction to literary analysis through close readings of texts from the early period through modern, including current Latin American literature.  The course engages students in the practice of textual criticism and provides basic theoretical background to develop critical skills.  Prerequisite: Advanced Spanish Review and Written Contemporary Spanish or equivalent and approval by the Director of the Latin American Studies Program.

LAS 2035: Spanish for Business and Commercial Practice
(3 cr.)
This course provides students with a solid foundation in business vocabulary, basic business and cultural concepts, and situational practice, thereby helping to prepare them for success in today's Spanish-speaking business world.  Key unfamiliar business vocabulary and cultural concepts are presented.  The business topics reflect the typical curriculum in an American Business School.

LAS 2058: Latin American Politics (3 cr.)
The course is an historical analysis of the last century of Latin American development.  The central theme is the relationship between Latin America and the industrialized world and the way in which international policies are constructed to insure the continuation of Latin American dependency.  Students will consider the problem agrarian societies confront when forced to industrialize, and the sometimes violent political solutions which are imposed as a consequence.  (In English)

LAS 3016: Latin American Civilization in the Arts (3 cr.)
Through the use of audio-visual materials, visits to museums, and readings, students explore the development of Latin American civilization through artistic production.  The course is divided into three sections: (1) the major pre- Columbian civilizations and the legacy of indigenous populations.  (2) The period of conquest and three centuries of colonial administration.  (3) The revolutionary period and the efforts made to assert political independence while resolving economic problems.  The course is constructed from an interdisciplinary perspective, emphasizing Latin American art, history, geography, and culture.

Related Courses
Spanish

  • SPN 2040: Spain and Latin America: Literature Nobel Prize Winners
  • SPN 3010: The Latin American Novel and Film
  • SPN 3014 Gabriel García Márquez and Magic Realism Writers
  • SPN 3028: Latin American Black Literature
  • SPN 3031: Women's Writings in Latin America
  • SPN 3034: Latino Literature in the United States
  • SPN 3035: Latin American Modernism
  • SPN 3038: Spanish Caribbean Literature
  • SPN 3042: Twentieth Century Latin American Poetry
  • SPN 3048: The Argentine Gaucho: The Man and the Myth

A compilation of courses offered each year is available through the Latin American Studies Faculty Committee.