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Courses

LIS 2002:  E-Literacy = Web Quest + Library Research   (1 cr.)
The web is thick with many strands of information. This course, which takes the student beyond web searching, provides an overview of a large variety of information- locating tools including catalogs, subscription databases, and reputable web resources.  Emphasis will be placed on accessing, critically evaluating, and citing these resources in order to create lifelong information retrieval skills. It is recommended that an LIS course be taken with a W/R designated course. Fulfills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation.

LIS 2002OC:  E-Literacy = Web Quest + Library Research (1 cr.)
An online version of the above course.

LIS 2004: Foundations of Library Research in Communication and Media (1 cr.)
This course focuses on library research methods in the field of communication and media. Since communication and media are highly influenced by context and source, this class will emphasize the accessing, evaluating, and citing of resources specific to this field.   It is recommended that an LIS course be taken with a W/R designated course. The final project for this class will be a presentation. Fufills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation.

LIS 2005: Foundations of Library Research: Social Science
(1 cr.)
This course focuses on library research methods for the social sciences including psychology, anthropology, political science, sociology, economics, and education.  This class will emphasize accessing, evaluating, and citing resources specific to the field. It is recommended that an LIS course be taken with a W/R designated course. The final project for this is an annotated bibliography. Fufills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation.

LIS 2006: Foundations of Library Research in Art History
(1 cr.)
This course aims to refine information literacy skills and create the foundation for lifelong learning. It introduces the art history student to advanced concepts of information retrieval, relevant techniques for accessing, collecting and synthesizing information, and the essential components of computer and information ethics and security. An integral part of the course is the introduction to the principle bibliographic tools in art historical research including using Chicago style citation. Students will be exposed to a wide range of research resources, including printed sources, online databases, ArtSTOR, and auction house catalogs. Students are advised to take this course if they are writing research papers or preparing for their thesis. Fufills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation.

LIS 2007:  Foundations of Library Research in the Humanities  (1 cr.)
This five-session class focuses on library research methods for the humanities, including religion, philosophy, literature, art history, and interdisciplinary fields such as American Studies. The ability to use a library effectively is particularly important for humanities research, in which a primary work is often reviewed, evaluated and interpreted over time.  It is recommended that an LIS course be taken with a W/R designated course.  Fulfills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation.

LIS 2010:  Business Information Resources  (1 cr.)
This five- session course introduces the student to core business tools for advanced studies in the various fields of business literature.  Its focus is on research resources, including databases and websites.  Emphasis is on critically analyzing and evaluating business sources.  Students will produce a "literature review" on a chosen business topic, after exploring basic business research methodologies. Fulfills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation, and may be taken either on-line or as a regularly scheduled class. 

LIS 2012: Beyond Google:  Using the Web to Research Effectively (1 cr.)
Information technology is changing the way research is conducted and the ease of accessing the Internet has opened a new chapter in that development. The history of the "web," evaluation of search engines and web research material, advanced database searching, Internet available subscription databases, and a special emphasis on the current role of Google, will be explored.  Critical thinking about web sources for academic work is at the core of this course. Fufills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation.

LIS 2014: Foundations of Library Research in the Natural Sciences Meeting (1 cr.)
This course aims to refine information literacy skills and create the foundation for lifelong learning. It introduces the science student to advanced concepts of information retrieval, relevant techniques for accessing, collecting and synthesizing information and essential components of computer and information ethics and security. The course will concentrate on science databases (such as Science Direct) and science journals. Students will learn to create search strategies and retrieve, evaluate, and cite resources. Students are advised to best take this course if they are writing research papers or preparing for their thesis. Fufills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation.

LIS 2015: Foundations of Library Research in Psychology
(1 cr.)
This course will focus on library research methods (not empirical research) for Psychology. This class will emphasize locating, accessing, evaluating, critically analyzing and citing scholarly resources specific to the field.  Emphasis will be placed upon researching and analyzing a Literature Review.  This class is open to any student and supports the Psychology Department curriculum.  Students will learn to use and cite properly each information source according to the APA bibliographic formatting style.  It is recommended that an LIS course be taken with a W/R designated course. Fufills the Information Literacy requirement for graduation.

LIS 3016: The Global Information Environment (1 cr.)
This class will help students adapt to the rapidly changing global information environment, incorporating considerations of nationality, culture, language and politics.   It is geared towards students doing research projects in sociology, communications, international studies, political science, history or foreign languages and fulfills the LIS requirement for graduation. Students will learn to determine what kinds of sources are appropriate for their research, access information efficiency and effectively, apply critical thinking skills to evaluate their sources, and use information ethically and legally. It is recommended that an LIS course be taken with a W/R designated course.