Academics Banner

Requirements

Major Requirements

A total of thirteen courses is required, six of which form a core and seven of which are electives. Ordinarily, students are also required to have a minor in one of the modern foreign languages offered at the College, as detailed below. 

Core courses:

  • INS 1008:  Introduction to Global Studies
  • POS 1037: International Politics I or POS 1038: International Politics II
  • INS 1010:  Global Economy
  • HIS 1036:  World History II: Since 1500
  • INS 2001:  World Cultures through Literature and Film
  • INS 3003:  Senior Seminar in International Studies

Elective courses:
Students must have a minimum of seven electives, at least five of which must be in a concentration, selected from the list below.  (A list of courses for the various concentrations can be found under "Courses").  At least six of the seven electives must be above the 1000 level and at least two of them must be at the 3000 level.  Also, at least one of the elective courses must include significant cultural material.  Each of the concentrations has certain internal requirements and guidelines, as indicated below.  

Possible concentrations (five courses required out of a total of  seven electives)

  • International Political/Economic Relations.  Appropriate for students with a minor in any foreign language.  At least three of the courses chosen should be general and comparative, while two others can be specific to a particular issue or area of the world.
  • International Management.  Appropriate for students with a minor in any foreign language.  Completion of this concentration, together with an appropriate internship or equivalent employment and at least one semester of study abroad earns the student the Certificate in International Management.  Note: This concentration requires both ECO 1011 and 1012 and entails six, not the usual five courses for the concentration.  The courses for this concentration are listed in the section below on "Certificate in International Management".
  • Asian Studies.  Particularly appropriate for students with a minor in Asian Studies, concentrating in either Japanese or Chinese language.  However, the five courses for the Asian Studies concentration within International Studies must be in addition to any courses used for the Asian Studies minor.  At least two of the five courses chosen should be focused on the modern world.
     
  • Latin American Studies.  Particularly appropriate for students with a minor in Spanish, or for students with native backgrounds in Spanish.  However, the five courses for the Latin American Studies concentration within International Studies must be in addition to any courses used for the Spanish or Latin American Studies minor.  At least two of the five courses chosen should be focused on the modern world.
  • African Studies.  Appropriate for students with a minor in any of the foreign languages, although French works particularly well, given its use in Northern and West Africa.  At least two of the five courses chosen should be focused on the modern world.
  • European Studies.  Appropriate for students with a minor in French, German, Spanish or Italian.  A least one of the five courses chosen must be comparative, i.e., focus on more than one West European nation or culture, and at least three must be focused on the modern world.
  • Global Cultural Studies.  Appropriate for students with a minor in any of the foreign languages.  At least two of the five courses chosen must be comparative and cross-cultural, i.e., must focus on the culture of more than one nation, and at least two must be focused on the modern world.
  • Global Justice.  Appropriate for students with a minor in any of the foreign languages.  At least one of the five courses must be an internship at a social service or human rights agency or NGO).
  • Self-designed.  Students may design their own concentrations within International Studies, but these must be based upon a convincing written rationale approved by the director at the time of First Portfolio Review. 


NEW! INTERNATIONAL STUDIES MINOR

Minor Requirements

Students interested in an INS minor will take six courses in all:

Four CORE courses:

INS 1008: Introduction to Global Studies (fall and spring)

INS 1010:  Global Economy (spring)

POS 1037: International Politics I or POS 1038: International Politics II (fall and spring)

INS 2001: World Cultures through Literature and Film (fall and spring)

AND

Two electives from any of the current INS concentrations assuming they have sufficient enrollment. At least one of the two electives must be at the 3000-level. 

It is highly recommended that students who minor in International Studies study a second language up through the first semester of Intermediate, i.e. 3 credits more than the required 6- credit second language requirement.

 

Language Requirement
International Studies majors are normally required to take one of the modern foreign languages as their minor. The standards for satisfying this are established by the respective language departments.  The language requirement also applies to students with double majors, one of which is International Studies. 

 

Students who can demonstrate native or near-native proficiency in a modern foreign language (including a secondary-school level of proficiency in reading and writing) may petition to the International Studies director to be exempted from the minor requirement.  The College requirement for a minor area in some other field still, however, applies.

Study Abroad
Living and studying abroad make a distinct contribution to the aims of the International Studies Program and provide an opportunity for progress in the foreign language of one's choice.  Manhattanville has developed cooperative study abroad programs in many of the world's major cities, and prospective International Studies majors are encouraged to consult the Study Abroad section in the College Catalog, as well as the Study Abroad Office for such opportunities.

Double Major
Students in the International Studies Program may take a double major, which necessitates fulfilling the major requirements of both departments.  If the two majors entail some identical course requirements, only one course may be double-counted.  Others must be made up with additional electives.  As noted above, International Studies majors ordinarily must also fulfill the requirements for a foreign language as a minor, even though such a minor is not otherwise required by the College for students with double majors.

Departmental Honors
Honors in International Studies are awarded to graduating seniors on the basis of the following:

  • An average of B+ or better in all courses applied toward the major (including any transfer courses approved for the major), as reflected on the student's Major Checklist from the Final Portfolio Review
  • A- or better on the Senior Evaluation

Certificate in International Management
A Certificate in International Management is awarded to students who complete a double major in International Studies and Management or who complete a major in International Studies with a concentration in Management.  Students must also complete an internship or equivalent employment with a non-profit or human rights organization, or a business firm or trade association with a significant international dimension.  Finally, students must spend at least one semester or summer session studying abroad.  The last requirement may be waived for students who have significant previous foreign residence experience.

For the purposes of the Certificate, a concentration in Management consists of a minimum of six courses from the following list (Note: Students cannot take more than two 1000-level courses for the purposes of the concentration):

  • MGT 1001: Fundamentals of Management*
  • MGT 1002: Fundamentals of Accounting I*
  • MGT 1003: Introduction to Marketing*
  • MGT 1008: Fundamentals of Accounting II*
  • MGT 2006: International Marketing*
  • MGT 2007: International Management*
  • ECO 3016: International Trade and Development
  • ECO 3017: Seminar in International Finance and the Global Economy