Academics Banner

Courses

This course list is organized according to the 3 tracks available within the English Major:

Literature Courses

Note: see "Creative and Professional Writing"and "Film" below for courses that may be used for a maximum of two electives in the Literature Concentration

ENG.1012: Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance Literature (4 cr.)
This course introduces students to major authors and the dominant genres of English literature in the medieval (to ca. 1485) and Renaissance (1485-ca. 1660) periods. Students will read literary works that shed light on what literature was understood to be in these two periods, what purposes it was believed to serve, who wrote it, how it was shared and read, and how it was received. Works will include Beowulf and "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight," as well as writings of Chaucer, Malory, Spencer, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, and Milton. This course is designed to develop students' fundamental college-level skills in critically analyzing and writing about literature.  (Fall) (Spring)

ENG.1014: Introduction to Victorian and Modern British Literature (4 cr.)
This course introduces students to major authors and the dominant genres of British literature in the Victorian (1830-1902) and Modern (1902-1945) periods. Students will read literary works that shed light on what literature was understood to be in these two periods, what purposes it was believed to serve, who wrote it, how it was shared and read, and how it was received. Authors will include novelists such as Dickens and Woolf; poets such as Tennyson, Barrett Browning, Browning, Arnold, the Rossettis, Hardy, Eliot, Yeats, and Auden; and playwrights such as Wilde. This course is designed to develop students' fundamental college-level skills in critically analyzing and writing about literature.  (Fall) (Spring)

ENG 1016: Introduction to American Literature (4 cr.)
 This course introduces students to some major authors and dominant genres of American literature in the Colonial, Civil War, Gilded Age, Modern, and Postmodern eras, roughly spanning the years 1776-1999. Some of the topics to be discussed include: reason and religion; slavery and its legacy; the rise of industrial capitalism; shifting attitudes toward gender and sexuality; the experience of immigration and global diaspora. Authors may include Jefferson, Franklin, Emerson, Hawthorne, Poe, Melville, Jacobs, Twain, Wharton, Frost, Cather, Hughes, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, O’Connor, Roth, Kingston, Baldwin, Morrison, Cisneros, Diaz, Lahiri. This course develops fundamental college-level skills in textual analysis (“close reading”) and constructing interpretative arguments about literary works (Fall) (Spring)

ENG 1017: Introduction to Postcolonial Literature (4 cr.) This course introduces students to major authors and the dominant genres of Postcolonial literature (1950-Present).  Students will read literary works that shed light on what literature was understood to be in this period, what purposes it was believed to serve, who wrote it, how it was shared and read, and how it ws received.  Authors include Chinua Achebe, Salman Rushdie, Emmanuel Dongala, Etel Adan, Aimee Cesaire, and Bapsi Sidhwa.  This course is designed to develop students’ fundamental college-level skills in critically analyzing and writing about literature.  (Fall) (Spring)

ENG 1018: Introduction to Neoclassical and Romantic British Literature (4 cr.)
 This course introduces students to major authors and the dominant genres of British literature in the Neoclassical (ca. 1660-1785) and Romantic (ca. 1785-1835) periods. Authors may include the novelists and prose fiction writers Defoe, Swift, Johnson, and Mary Shelley, the dramatists William Congreve and John Gay, and the poets Pope, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and Keats.  Attention will also be given to visual artists Hogarth and Turner.  This course is designed to develop students’ fundamental college-level skills in critically analyzing and writing about literature. (Fall, ‘13; Spring, ‘14; Fall, ‘14)

ENG.2021: Shakespearean Page and Stage (3 cr.) Looking at early-modern play texts and performance techniques, this course examines the literary and theatrical conditions of Shakespeare’s theater. Students will learn about how Shakespeare's theater was organized; how Shakespeare's plays were printed; and how the early-modern stage operated. We will begin by examining early-modern editions of Romeo and Juliet and Hamlet.  In the second half of the course, students will think about how plays were mounted on the early-modern stage and how Shakespeare understood the art of performance. This course is designed to develop students' intermediate-level skills in critically analyzing and writing about literature both comparatively and in context, while also reinforcing students' fundamental skills in analytical reading and writing. Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Spring)

ENG 2035: Victorian Literature (3 cr.) This course offers an introduction to key authors, texts, and preoccupations of the Victorian era.  Victorian authors sought to explore identity and to represent the human experience under the influence of such powerful social forces and ideas as industrialization, imperialism, the "Woman Question," and evolutionary theory.  Fiction and non-fiction prose writers include C. Bronte, Carlyle, Darwin, Dickens, G. Eliot, Pater, Ruskin, and Trollope; poets include Arnold, Barrett Browning, E. Bronte, Browning, Hopkins, Kipling, C. and D.G. Rossetti, Swinburne, and Tennyson. Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Spring, ’14)

ENG 2047: The Jazz Age (3 cr.)
 This course will examine a period in American social and intellectual history that produced some of the grandest names in literary folklore and a timeless catalog of great literature.  The battlefields of World War I, 1920's Paris and New York, the beaches of Key West and the French Riviera, and the breadlines of the Great Depression are just a sample of the settings out of which emerged a feverish moment in American literature. (Summer)

ENG 2050: Early American Literature: Puritans to the Civil War (3 cr.)
 The course examines American writers from the colonial period to the Civil War, including Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Poe, Douglass, Hawthorne, Melville and Whitman.  These writers helped to define the American identity by exploring conflicts and contradictions that still shape our American experience: the conflicts between spirituality and materialism, individualism and community, idealism and pragmatism, economic opportunity and economic exploitation, romanticism and realism. Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course.  (Spring, ‘15)

ENG 2051: The Age of Realism (3 cr.)
 This course concentrates on literature written on the eve of the Civil War to the first years of the 20th century (1855-1910s.) Against a background of developments in American intellectual and cultural history, we’ll focus on stylistic innovations such as the invention of free verse (Whitman), modes of American vernacular speech (Twain, Chesnutt), unreliable narration (James, Gilman), the renovation of traditional poetic forms (Dickinson, Frost), and the impact of literary movements like sentimentalism (Stowe), realism (Howells), naturalism (Crane, Dreiser), and modernism (Cather, Stein, Anderson). Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Spring, ‘14)

ENG 2052: American Modernism (3 cr.)
 This course explores a diverse range of American literature written from 1910-1950.  We will consider what is “modern” or “modernist” about the form and content of these works and situate them in relation to relevant historical and cultural contexts. Our syllabus will be selected from diverse authors of the period—e.g., James, Stein, Frost, Cather, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, T.S. Eliot, W.C. Williams, T. Williams, Hughes, Faulkner, Hurston, Larsen, Steinbeck, Ellison—who offer complex, and often conflicting, responses to the conditions of modernity in the United States. Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Fall, ‘13)

ENG 2057: Reading Shakespeare (3 cr.)
 This course will focus on close reading of five plays by Shakespeare, examining the rich possibilities inherent in the text from various perspectives: the English major's critical approach, the scholar's concern with text, the Elizabethan audience's cultural expectations, the actor's conception of a character, the director's wider view of the play, and the playwright's all-encompassing vision of humanity.  Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Fall)

ENG 2065: Women's Writing (3 cr.) This course offers an introduction to women's writing from ancient times until the present, with a concentration on the 19 th-21st-centuries.   By reading a variety of genres principally poetry, the novel, and the short story we will explore how women authors of different times and nationalities have represented themselves and their gender in literatures.   Additional topics will include women's approaches to love, family relationships, artistic achievement, and social differences. Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Spring, ’15)

ENG 2075: Modern Asian Literature (3 cr.) This course is an introduction to some of the critical issues and debates in Asian literary studies. Through a survey of literature from Japan, China and India since the 1930’s, students will explore political, social, literary, and religious developments in these areas.  We will look at major developments such as the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in the 1930’s, the defeat and reconstruction of Japan, the partitioning of India in 1947, and the Cultural Revolution in China, among others.  Representative texts will be studied with attention to their historical background and the aesthetic and cultural values that informed them.  Students will focus on the convergence of religion and gender with race and ethnicity.  Readings will include Xiao Hong’s Field of Life and Death, Yu Hua’s Chronicle of a Blood Merchant, and Shauna Singh Baldwin’s What the Body Remembers. Prerequiste: Completion of one 1000-level ENG course. (Fall, ‘15)

ENG 2076: American Literature after 1945 (3 cr.)
 This course considers American writers from 1945 to the present. We begin with several writers (Vonnegut, Salinger, Roth) who wrote about their experience as soldiers in World War Two; then we turn to “Beats” (Kerouac, Ginsberg), freaks (O’Connor), blacks (Brooks, Clifton) and feminists (Plath) from the 1950s to the 1980s.  Next, we examine the relationship of language to memory and violence in Nabokov, Morrison, McCarthy, and Robinson. A final unit considers globalization, the post-nuclear family, and irony by way of narratives written from 1985-2006 (Delillo, Lahiri, Saunders, Safran Foer, Eisenberg). Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Spring, ‘14)

ENG 2077: Caribbean Literature (3 cr.) This course will provide students with a critical overview of some of the central themes and issues that have appeared in the works of a variety of Caribbean  writers. The main areas of inquiry will include the notions of exile, the importance of language, the articulation of identity in post-colonial societies and the issues of race, gender, culture, and ethnicity.  We will also look at some of the socio-political  developments that have impacted the region. Writers include Earl Lovelace, Louise Bennet, Orlando Patterson, V.S. Naipaul, George Lamming. Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Fall ‘13)

ENG 2087: The English Novel (3 cr.)
This seminar will examine conceptions, conventions, and innovations of the British novel from the late eighteenth- through the twentieth century, tracing its evolution from an upstart form of popular entertainment to an established literary genre.  Studying representative novels within their respective cultural contexts and in conjunction with recent scholarship on the history of the novel, students will consider how the British novel provided an outlet for the expression of new voices and new values in literature; how it experimented with different representational mediums such as realism and impressionism; and how its rise to prominence in and diversification within the literary marketplace is reflective of changes in the social and political fabric of Great Britain.  Potential novelists include Austen, Dickens, C. Bronte, Trollope, Hardy, Woolf, Greene, and Coe. Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course. (Fall)

ENG 2092: Post-Modernism and the Late Twentieth Century (3 cr.) For many, the term postmodernism refers to a historical period that stretches from the 1960s to the present, marked by developments such as the Cold War, rise in technology and the growth of the suburbs as a cultural force.  The purpose of this study is to look at the impact of this movement as it shaped the literary productions of the twentieth century.  We will examine some of the themes and techniques of post-modernism: inter-textuality, hyper-textuality, pastiche, metafiction, fabulation, magical realism, techno-culture, etc. Writers include Rushdie, Murakami, Orhan Pamuk, Gloria Anzaldua -- and publications such as McSweeney's, The Believer, and the fiction pages of The New Yorker. Prerequisite: Completion of one 1000 level English course.(Fall, ‘16)

ENG 3026: Shakespeare on Film (3 cr.)
 Through films or videotapes of Shakespeare's plays, we will explore how productions illuminate, enhance, or distort the script and how the change of medium makes different effects possible or even necessary.   This course will examine interpretations of the text as well as foster awareness of dramatic and film technique.   Previous study of Shakespeare is very helpful. This course may be used as an elective for the Film Concentration. The course will culminate in a research paper.  Prerequisite: completion of two 2000-level English courses or permission of instructor. (Fall, ‘13) (Fall, ‘15)

ENG 3050: American Poetry (3 cr.)
 This course studies American poetry through the lens of a particular theme: modernism vs. postmodernism, Whitman and his 20th c. heirs, or—the theme of 2013—the relation of poetic form (the sonnet, iambic pentameter, ballad stanzas) to unsettling ideas about power, religion, and gender (Frost, Stevens, Bishop, Plath). As a result of taking this course, students will refine their close reading skills and gain the historical background necessary to appreciate many varieties of twentieth-century poetry; creative writers will encounter powerful literary models that expand one’s sense of what poetry can be and do. The course will culminate in a research paper.  Prerequisite: completion of two 2000-level English courses or permission of instructor. (Fall, ‘13) (Fall, ‘15)

ENG 3057: Hawthorne, Melville, Poe (3 cr.) This seminar examines in depth the short stories and the novels of Hawthorne, Melville, and Poe, focusing on their shared literary techniques and their relationship to earlier American thought.  Special emphasis will be placed on the ways in which they developed or diverged from Emerson's use of symbolism as a literary technique and as a means of shaping one's understanding of reality.  The course will culminate in a research paper.  Prerequisite: completion of two 2000-level English courses or permission of instructor. (Spring, ‘15)

ENG 3071: Laughter: Definitions of Comedy (3 cr.) This seminar will explore the nature of comedy in its various forms from classical times to the present. It will examine comedy's appearance in various genres: drama, fiction, and film. At each of the weekly meetings, the course will pair a reading with a film. Seminar sessions will be organized around reports and discussion.  The course will culminate in a research paper.  Prerequisite: completion of two 2000-level English courses or permission of instructor. (Spring, ‘14)

ENG 3083: Literary Theory and Criticism (3 cr.) This class will introduce the students to a body of ideas and methods that will offer a different understanding of literature. Literary theory allows us to look at the relationship between author and work and question the role of the author; it also allows us to look at the significance of race, class, and gender  from political, social, cultural and socio-economic frameworks. Literary theory offers us a multiplicity of approaches to a single text. These competing systems of inquiry often lead to disagreements but as Gerald Graff argues in “Beyond Culture Wars,” these disagreements are healthy and they make us better readers.  Students will be required to be active participants in the discussions. The course will culminate in a research paper. (Spring)

ENG 3107: Writing Africa (3 cr.)  The end of colonialism in the 20th Century has in recent years given rise to studies devoted to reexamining the history, politics, language, and literary representations of the colonial era.  This class will examine African writers as they attempt to grapple with the history of European representation of Africa.  We will examine some of the most recent debates such as Africa versus European languages, Negritude, Pan-Africanism, gender, identity and the current ethnic problems that have led to genocide in some areas.  Readings will include: Emmanuel Dongala’s Fire of Origins, Ferdinand Oyono’s the Old Man and the Medal, Ama Ata Aido’s Our Sister Kiljoy, Ousman Sembne’s God’s Bits of Wood, and Philip Gourevitich’s We Wish to Inform You that Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families: Stories from Rawanda. The course will culminate in a research paper. Prerequisite: completion of two 2000-level English courses or permission of instructor.

ENG 3117: Reading and Writing Literature in the Digital Age (3 cr.) This course focuses on the ways that literature, broadly defined, has attempted to position itself with respect to other forms of media (TV, film, internet, comics, etc.) from the mid-1980s to the present. Can literary works absorb and represent forms of aesthetic experience that are primarily non-verbal, graphic, sonic, or based on moving images or hyperlinks? Students will develop critical frameworks for analyzing literature alongside visual or web-based objects, and use these critical tools to ask questions about the changing nature of modern reading and writing practices, different styles of attention, modes of selfhood (online and off), and methods of gathering information in the twenty-first century. The course will culminate in a research paper.  Prerequisite: completion of two 2000-level English courses or permission of instructor. (Spring, ‘15)

ENG 3118: Major Modern Authors (Fitzgerald and Hemingway) (3 cr.) (to be renumbered)
 This course considers some of the major works of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway.  Working chronologically, we will gain a sense of the contours of each author’s literary career; discern characteristic patterns and themes within and among each author; and get a feel for the historical circumstances in which both men wrote. Topics to be discussed include: the relation of literature to an author’s life, ideals of masculinity and femininity, America vs. Europe, and the genesis of a distinctive prose style. Throughout the course, students will practice writing critically about multiple prose genres (stories, novels, essays, memoirs, letters, scholarly criticism).  The course will culminate in a research paper.  Prerequisite: completion of two 2000-level English courses or permission of instructor. (Spring, ‘14)

ENG 3119: Monstrous Women in the Renaissance (3 cr.) The goal of this course is to introduce students to the study of gender in the English Renaissance, focusing specifically on how imaginative texts contributed to the cultural dialogue about women. Using the category of the “monstrous” as a lens through which we examine images of sexuality, witchcraft, madness, cross-dressing, and fantastical female creatures, we will think about how gender was a site of Renaissance debates about what constituted the human. The course will culminate in a research paper. Prerequisite: completion of two 2000-level English courses or permission of instructor.  (Spring)

ENG 3998: Senior Thesis (3 cr.)
 A substantial research essay of approximately 25 pages with appropriate documentation.  This course is required of all senior English majors.  Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 3083 or ENF 3075 and one additional 3000-level ENG course. (Fall) (Spring)  

Creative And Professional Writing Courses

ENW 1013: Approaches to Creative Writing (3 cr.)
 In this introductory class, students study and practice several forms: fiction, poetry, non-fiction and dramatic.  The clas looks closely at diction, structure, voice, character, narrative tension and oint of view.  Students read, study and critique published and peer work, with later classes introducing the workshop method. (Fall) (Spring)

ENW 2040: Writing for the Media (3 cr.) 
Oriented toward social-science and business media, this creative nonfiction course examines issues of style, history, ethics and practice in writing for media research and criticism, public relations, advertising and the internet. Types of writing to be covered include copy editing, position papers, proposals, releases, "backgrounders" and new media copy.  Students interested in journalism should take ENW 4011. (Spring)

ENW 2016: Narrative Studies (3 cr.) Students continue the work begun in Approaches to Creative Writing, a prerequisite (with a grade of C+ or better), looking more closely at voice, diction, point of view, character and character action, and paying particular attention to structure and form in getting at what defines and creates compelling narrative. (Fall) (Spring)

ENW 3998: Senior Writing Portfolio (3 cr.)
The student's work in the Creative and Professional Writing concentration culminates in the Senior Writing Portfolio.   Each student meets individually and regularly with a mentor. The Portfolio will consist of at least forty pages of creative non-fiction, fiction, journalism, or poetry. Since the finished manuscript will demonstrate the student's mastery of language and form, students should include work in only one or two genres.  Note: a grade of "C" or higher is required for graduation. Students may be asked to repeat ENW 3998 in the Spring of their senior year if this criterion is not met.  (Fall)

ENW 4003: Screenwriting Workshop I (3 cr.) 
Students are introduced to the craft of visual story-telling, exploring character, dialogue, plot setting and tone.   Students view movies weekly and read extensively in professional film scripts.   Each week student writing is discussed in a workshop format.  The semester project is the completion of the "First Act" of a feature screenplay, approximately thirty pages of writing, as well as an accompanying outline of the entire screenplay.   May be used as an elective for the Film Concentration.  (Fall)
 


ENW 4004: Screenwriting Workshop II (3 cr.)
Students continue their work begun in ENW 4003. They work intensely on their own projects, workshopping scenes and sequences. Class lectures involve thorough examinations of story structure and address larger questions of authenticity and voice. ENW 4004 requires a major commitment to reading, viewing, and writing.  The Semester project is the completion of a full-length feature film script draft of at least 90 pages.   Prerequisite: Grade of "B" or better in ENW 4003. This class is repeatable for credit. May be used as an elective for the Film Concentration.   (Spring)

ENW 4009: Poetry Workshop (3 cr.)
 The poetry workshop presents an opportunity for students to write and revise poems in free or fixed forms.  Emphasis is on three elements of poetry: 1) memorable language, 2) remarkable imagery, 3) engaging story lines. This class is repeatable for credit.  (Fall) (Spring)

ENW 4011: Journalism (3 cr.)
 Students will learn about news, feature and article writing as well as plan and carry out reporting assignments on topics of current interest. The course will include discussion of such issues as objectivity, ethics, investigation and interpretation.   Occasionally the class will visit or be visited by working journalists.   Prerequisite: a minimum of B in ENC 4010 or an equivalent writing course.  This class is repeatable for credit.   (Fall) (Spring)

ENW 4012: Journalism II (3 cr.) Students continue study begun in Journalism I, a prerequisite (with a grade of B or better).  This class looks at works of extended journalism.  Students are expected to study and write features, profiles, and investigative pieces, as well as submit material to appropriate campus student publications.  (Spring, ‘14)

ENW 4020: Fiction Workshop (3 cr.)
Through readings, discussion and critique, students will hone their skills and refine their literary judgment.  A minimum of 40 pages of manuscript during the semester is required; this may take the form of drafts of a single story, several shorter pieces, or an extended work.  Prerequisite: Grade of C+ or better in ENW 2030 or ENW 3008.  This class is repeatable for credit.  (Fall) (Spring)

ENW 4030: Advanced Fiction Workshop (3 cr.)
In this advanced seminar class, admitted students will look deeply at voice, character, plot and language in both published and peer work. Students will be expected to produce new work, in the form of short stories and/or novel excerpts.   This course is writing and reading intensive. Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in ENW 4020.  (Spring)


Film Studies Courses

Note: The following literature and writing courses may also be used as electives for the Film Concentration: ENG 3020, ENG 3026, ENG 3071, ENG 3101, ENW 2040, ENW 4003, ENW 4004.

ENF 1001: Introduction to Film Studies (4 cr.) This course introduces students to descriptive, technical, and critical terms and concepts used by filmmaker and scholars to analyze film.  Students view a representative variety of American and foreign films from mainstream, art cinema, documentary, and avant-garde traditions to become better readers of cinema.  Student will watch films that shed light on how cinema is produced, what purposes it has served, how filmmakers have created cinema, and how it has been share, read, and received as art, public discourse, and a vehicle for social analysis.  This course is designed to develop students’ fundamental college-level skills in critically analyzing and writing about cinema. (Fall) (Spring)

ENF 2079: Women's Film (4 cr.) 
This course examines films written, directed, and/or produced by women.   Although the majority of films treated will be by American women, significant examples will be drawn from other countries as well.   Special attention will be given to artists who attempt to develop film images of women that are freed from the stereotypes imposed by the classical Hollywood film.   Alternates every other year with ENF 2080: American Film.  (Spring, ‘15)

ENF 2080: American Film (4 cr.)
 This course begins with an examination of representative American film genres, such as the western, the gangster, and the screwball comedy, tracing their roots back to early American literature and culture, and following their development to the present. The course will also examine major new directors in contemporary American cinema.   Taught every other year, this course alternates with ENG 3076: Women's Film.   (Spring, ‘14)
 


ENF 2088: History of Cinema 1: The Beginnings to WW II (4 cr.) 
Topics include pre-20th-century protohistory; the cinema of attractions; the development of narrative, features, stars and the classical Hollywood studio system; French impressionism; Weimar expressionism; Scandinavian naturalism; Soviet montage; documentary and avant-garde cinema; early Asian film; the changeover to sound; censorship; French poetic realism; developments in British, German and Latin American film.   Students are not required to take part 2.   (Fall)

ENF 2089: History of Cinema 2: WW II to the Present (4 cr.) 
The course begins with the war years and includes: Italian neorealism, film noir, the decline of the Hollywood studio system, and new documentary and avant-garde approaches. Also considered are: International art cinemas from Europe and Japan in the 50s and 60s and other key movements, from Brazilian Cinema Novo to New German Cinema, African and Indian cinema and other postcolonial cinemas.  The course also examines: Hollywood's revival and its increasing commercialism, China's "Fifth Generation," feminist and other independent practice, and films from Australia, the Middle East, Hong Kong and elsewhere.  Part 1 is not a prerequisite.  (Spring)



ENF 3075: Film Theory (4 cr.)
This course will examine the range of contemporary theory about film through readings and viewings of selected films.   The writings of earlier film theorists such as Eisenstein, Kracauer, Deren, and Bazin will provide a base for the examination of more recent theories rooted in genre studies, semiotics, Marxism, psychoanalysis, and feminism. Prerequisite: ENF 1001: Introduction to Film Studies. Research paper.  (Fall, ‘13; Spring, ‘15)

ENF 3173: Queer Film and Media Studies (4 cr.) 
This seminar explores "queer theory" as applied to one of its key texts, the mass media and particularly film. We historicize lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered and other queer media from Weimar culture to Hollywood's Production Code era, from underground cinema to later cracks into mainstream, avant-garde and new media. Coverage of AIDS receives attention, as do lesbian-feminist issues, the now- mainstream gay representations in the news, TV and other media, New Queer Cinema, controversial artists in photography, and other U.S. and international expressions of queer politics and culture. Research paper required. Prerequisite: One previous course in film studies or Comm 1001 or instructor permission. (Spring, ‘15)

ENF 3998: Senior Thesis in Film Studies (3 cr.)
A substantial research essay of approximately 25 pages with appropriate documentation.  This course is required of all senior English majors.  Prerequisite: Completion of ENF 3075. (Fall) (Spring)

ENF 4010: Major Film Directors (4 cr.)
This course examines several filmmakers whose work has been considered to have sufficient consistency and merit as to be made by an "author."  We interrogate the concept of authorship in cinema in terms of its history, politics, explanatory power, use as marketing strategy and other strengths and limitations.   Directors will vary, but the course is international in focus, with at least one non-English language filmmaker represented.  Prerequisite: One other film studies course or Instructor's permission. (Spring, ‘14)

ENF 4020: Topics in Film Genres (4 cr.)
 The basics of genre are considered through the prism of one genre studied in depth.  Iconography, narrative, theme, ideology, audience response, generic evolution and industrial marketing of genres are explored.  Hollywood films form the backbone for analysis, but alternatives receive attention.  Focus varies with each offering and could include horror, the musical, gangster film, science fiction, Westerns, film noir, documentary, comedy, melodrama.  Prerequisite: One film studies course, or permission of instructor.  (Spring, ‘14)

ENF: 4030: Transnational/Global Film and Media (4 cr.)
 This course considers one or, for comparative study, two cinemas in historical, cultural, aesthetic and political contexts.   Key filmmakers receive attention, and concepts of identity, the nation and Diaspora are interrogated.   Some cinemas to be studied include Asian, German and Scandinavian, French, International Jewish, Pan-African, British and Irish, Soviet/Russian, Italian film or others.   Prerequisite: One film studies course, or permission of instructor. (Spring, ’15)