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Course Descriptions
BIO 1001/1002: Principles of Biology I and II (4 cr. each)

This two-semester lecture sequence, complemented with hands-on laboratory experience, stresses the major biological principles and concepts that serve as the foundation for study in the biological and health-related fields. The first semester includes such topics as: the chemistry of biological systems, cell and historical organization, membrane transport, metabolism and evolution of organisms, with the major focus on the principles of Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics, and population genetics. The second semester stresses animal and plant organization, development, and physiology. Laboratory sessions provide opportunities to gain technical experience and to improve laboratory-related writing skills. The BIO 1001-1002 sequence is strongly recommended; however, students may take BIO 1002 before BIO 1001. (Fall) (Spring)

CHM 1001: Principles of Chemistry I (3 cr.)

Topics include Matter and Measurements; Atoms, Molecules, and Ions; Mass Relations in Chemistry; Stoichiometry; Reactions in Aqueous Solution; Gases; Electronic Structure and the Periodic Table; Covalent Bonding; Thermochemistry; Liquids and Solids; and Solutions. Prerequisite: Four years of high school mathematics. Recommended: High school chemistry. Corequisite: CHM 1003, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. Note: Earning a C- or better in this course and in CHM 1003 fulfills both a Scientific Reasoning competency and Science Distribution requirement. (Fall & Summer Session I)

CHM 1002: Principles of Chemistry II (3 cr.)

Topics include Rate of Reaction; Gaseous Chemical Equilibrium; Acids and Bases; Equilibria in Acid-Base Solutions; Complex ion and Precipitation Equilibria; Spontaneity of Reaction; Electrochemistry; Nuclear Reactions; Complex Ions and Coordination compounds; Chemistry of the Metals and Nonmetals; and Intro to Organic Chemistry. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 1001 and in CHM 1003. Corequisite: CHM 1004, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. Note: Earning a C- or better in this course and in CHM 1004 fulfills both a Scientific Reasoning competency and Science Distribution requirement. (Spring & Summer Session II)

CHM 1003: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory I (1 cr.)

This course presents laboratory techniques and experimental methods that demonstrate the principles studied in CHM 1001. Corequisite: CHM 1001, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. Note: Earning a C- or better in this course and in CHM 1001 fulfills both a Scientific Reasoning competency and Science Distribution requirement. (Fall & Summer Session I)

CHM 1004: Principles of Chemistry Laboratory II (1 cr.)

This course presents laboratory techniques and experimental methods that demonstrate the principles studied in CHM 1002. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 1001 and in CHM 1003. Corequisite: CHM 1002, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. Note: Earning a C- or better in this course and in CHM 1002 fulfills both a Scientific Reasoning competency and Science Distribution requirement. (Spring & Summer Session II

CHM 2001: Organic Chemistry I (3 cr.)

This course is a study of the major classes of organic compounds, designed to provide students with the background in organic chemistry needed for advanced study in chemistry and the life sciences. Topics include structure and bonding; polar covalent bonds; acid and base reactions; alkanes and their stereochemistry; cycloalkanes and their stereochemistry; stereochemistry; overview of chemical reactions; alkenes: structure and reactivity; alkenes: reactions and synthesis; alkynes: introduction to organic synthesis; organohalides; and nucleophilic substation and elimination reactions. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 1002 and in CHM 1004. Corequisite: CHM 2005, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. (Fall & Summer Session I)

CHM 2002: Organic Chemistry II (3 cr.)

This course is a study of the major classes of organic compounds, designed to provide students with the background in organic chemistry needed for advanced study in chemistry and the life sciences. Topics include structure determination: mass spectrometry, IR spectroscopy, 13C NMR and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and UV-VIS spectroscopy; conjugated compounds; benzene and aromaticity; electophilic aromatic substitution; alcohols and phenol; ethers, epoxides, thiols and sulfides; carbonyl chemistry; chemistry of aldehydes and ketones; and chemistry of carboxylic acids and nitriles. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 2001 and in CHM 2005. Corequisite: CHM 2006, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. (Spring & Summer Session II)

CHM 2005: Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2 cr.)

This course applies laboratory techniques and experimental methods to the topics and reactions studied in CHM 2001. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 1002 and in CHM 1004. Corequisite: CHM 2001, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. (Fall & Summer Session I)

CHM 2006: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2 cr.)

This course applies laboratory techniques and experimental methods to the topics and reactions studied in CHM 2002. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 2001 and in CHM 2005. Corequisite: CHM 2002, unless a grade of C- or better was previously earned. (Spring & Summer Session II)

Bio 3061: Biochemistry and Lab I (4 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce students to the interrelatedness of molecular framework, biomolecular activities and functioning of living organisms. Structure and function of proteins, enzymology, bioenergetics, and glucose metabolism (Glycolysis, TCA cycle) are emphasized. Lab exercises are designed to introduce students to a variety of biochemical analytical techniques, preparative procedures and instruments used in biochemical experimentation. Students apply the methods in projects designed to gain experience in developing and applying protocols for biochemical research. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II, Principles of Chemistry I and II, Organic Chemistry I and II. (Fall)

Bio 3062: Biochemistry and Lab I (4 cr.)

The second part of a two-semester lecture sequence, complemented by hands-on laboratory experience, emphasizes biochemical metabolic pathways (Electron transport chain, Fermentation, Fatty acid metabolism, Cori Cycle and etc.) Prerequisites: Biochemistry I. (Spring)

CHM 2009: Physical Chemistry I (3 cr.)

In this course the principles of chemical thermodynamics with applications to phase and solution equilibria; electrochemistry; and reaction kinetics is taught. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C- in CHM 2002, PHY 1002 or PHY 1004, and MATH 1032. (Fall 2012)

College Physics I and II (PHY 1001 & 1002). 4 credits each.

This is a year-long, two-course sequence that is designed to be a general physics introduction for students in chemistry, life sciences, or pre-health programs, as well as any students interested in understanding the physical world through mathematical laws while developing analytic reasoning and quantitative analysis skills. The course does not use calculus, but requires familiarity with basic algebra and trigonometry. There is a laboratory component in both semesters.

Topics in the first semester include: kinematics, dynamics, Newton's Laws, circular motion, work and energy, linear momentum, rotational kinematics, simple harmonic motion, temperature and heat, waves and sound, and interference. In the second semester (College Physics II), topics include: electric forces and fields, electric potential, direct-current circuits, magnetic forces and fields, magnetic induction, electromagnetism, electromagnetic waves and light, geometrical and wave optics, and selected topics in modern physics (e.g. special relativity, atomic physics, or quantum physics). Thesecourses are offered every academic year and during summer session, but must be taken in sequence.

MATH 1030: Calculus I (4 cr.)

Topics in this course will include functions, limits, and continuity; derivatives of polynomials, products, quotients, trigonometric, and implicit functions; applications to related rates, maximum-minimum problems and graphing; anti-derivatives, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area problems. A computer symbolic algebra component is included. Prerequisite: four years of high school mathematics or Introduction to College Math or its equivalent. (Fall) (Spring)

MATH 1032: Calculus II (4 cr.)

Topics in this course will include applications of integrals to volumes of revolution, differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions, indeterminate forms, techniques of integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor's Theorem, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. A computer symbolic algebra component is included. Prerequisite: Calculus I. (Fall) (Spring)

BIO 3099: Research Seminar (2 cr.)

This seminar course is designed to introduce the student to scientific research problems and to aid critical problem-solving skills through reading and writing in a scientific field of interest. It focuses on literature research, elements of experimental design, testing a hypothesis, analysis of data, reading and writing journal articles, and the use of computers for writing, graphics, and presentation. By the end of the semester, the student will have completed an extended protocol and have established a working literature base for their senior project. This course should be taken in the spring semester of the junior year (or in the third from the last semester for accelerated programs). Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II, Principles of Chemistry I and II. (Fall)

BIO 3499: Senior Research (3 cr.)

This independent laboratory course is based on the work completed in the Research Seminar. Students will work closely with a Biology faculty member to establish their experimental design, standardize their protocols, and conduct their research. This course should be taken in the fall semester of the senior year (or in the second from the last semester for accelerated programs). Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II, Principles of Chemistry I and II, Research Seminar. (Fall)

BIO 3998: Senior Evaluation (2 cr.)

This is the final semester in the three-semester research program in Biology. In this course, students will finish their research, analyze their data and organize it into their final thesis. The final written thesis is presented as a journal article for publication and is due at the end of the semester. In addition, all students must formally present their research to the Biology department. This course is taken in the spring semester of the senior year or in the final semester in accelerated programs. Prerequisites: Principles of Biology I and II, Principles of Chemistry I and II, Research Seminar Senior Research. (Spring)

Biology Electives and Chemistry Electives, please refer to the Biology Dept and Chemistry Dept. website