Manhattanville Reid Castle In the Spring

Courses Offered 2013-2014

 

ARH 1021: American Colonial Art and Life (3 cr.)

This course will investigate painting, architecture, sculpture and the decorative arts in America from the time of the earliest European settlers through the Revolutionary War.  Native American influences will also be examined.  Works of art will be placed within the context of historical events and social development. (Fall)

ARH 1030: History of Photography (3 cr.)

A survey of the history of photography from its earliest years to the present. We will examine the impact of various inventions upon the practice of this art form and also look at the work of some past and present masters. Commercial, documentary and art photography will be discussed. The course is non-technical in nature. (Fall)

ARH 2001: Contemporary Art (3 cr.)

The art of the present is the result of a series of revolutions in thinking and seeing.  In 1903, the Wright brothers flew the first power driven aircraft. In 1905, Albert Einstein indicated that matter could no longer be considered solid with his theory of relativity.  Radical changes in art also emerged during the first decade of this century that set the stage for new philosophical and technical approaches to the making of art. Through slide lectures, selected readings and museum visits this course will examine some of the movements, events and significant players in the evolution of a modernist aesthetic.  Among the topics considered: Cubism, other forms of abstract art and the panorama of more recent movements such as Pop Art, Happenings, conceptual Art and Installation Art, Minimalism, Earth Art and Body Art, Photo-realism, Neo-expressionism, Post Modernism, video and Performance Art. (Fall)

ARH 2022: Art of Ancient Egypt (3 cr.)

This class will introduce students to the artistic, architectural and cultural production of Ancient Egypt from the Neolithic through the Roman periods.  Through the study of Egyptian Art and Architecture, student will be come acquainted with the issues and methods of the study of art history, with a particular emphasis on the importance of historical and archaeological context.  Objects in and visits to New York City museums will be an integral part of his course. (Spring)

ARH 2025: Survey of African Art (3 cr.)

This course surveys the history of art in Africa from ancient times to the present. Students will be introduced to the stylistic diversity of African art by examining the aesthetic qualities and the religious, social, and ethnographic functions and meanings of African art forms. Particular attention will be given to figural and masking traditions; other topics will include textile design, architecture, and royal arts. (Fall)

ARH 2038: Baroque Art & Architecture in Italy (3 cr.)

This lecture course introduces students to the painting, sculpture, and architecture produced in Italy during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Lectures will examine cultural, political, and intellectual changes in seventeenth century Europe that make the art of this period distinctive. Topics to be explored include the emerging prominence of female artists; architecture and urbanism in Rome; the impact of the Counter-Reformation and Council of Trent on the arts; changing patterns of patronage; antiquarianism and art collecting. We will also examine the careers of individual artists in depth, including Bernini, Caravaggio, the Carracci, and Artemisia Gentileschi. There will be a midterm, final and one essay (2-3 pages). (Spring)

ARH 2042 Art of Civilization’s Cradle: Ancient Iran and Iraq (3 cr.)

This course explores the artistic production of the region known as “The Cradle of Civilization,” corresponding roughly to modern Iraq and Iran, from the Neolithic period, through the ebb and flow of major empires such as the Akkadian, Babylonian, Assyrian, and Achaemenid Persian; and the fusion with Greco-Roman traditions in the  Parthian and Sassanian Empires.  This course will draw upon, and will feature visits to, the collections of the Departments of Ancient Near Eastern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.  (Fall)

ARH 20XX Islamic Art (3 cr.)

This lecture course will examine the history of Islamic art and architecture of the Mediterranean region from Spain to the Middle East and including North Africa. The artistic traditions of Islam from the 7th century to the present will be examined with particular attention given to architecture, textiles, ceramics, metalwork, and manuscript illumination. There will be two required field trips, to the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s new galleries for the Art of the Arab Lands, and to the Islamic Cultural Center of New York, New York City’s largest mosque. (Spring)

CSCH3002: Decoding da Vinci  (4 cr.)

This interdisciplinary seminar takes as its point of departure Dan Brown’s contemporary fictional thriller, The DaVinci Code.  The class will use this pop culture phenomenon as the starting point for analysis of primary texts that will allow for a deeper understanding of the more controversial historical “facts” alleged by Dan Brown.  Students will read biblical, exegetical, and Gnostic literature to come to a better understanding of the historical identity of Saint Mary Magdalene.  The class with then be introduced to the discipline of art history – and will begin an in-depth analysis of the life and work of one of the best known, but perhaps least-understood, artists of the Italian Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci.  We will read Leonardo’s own words about the making of art, as well as those of other authors who in one way or another invent or reinvent Leonardo, from the sixteenth century biography of Leonardo written by Giorgio Vasari to Sigmund Freud’s famous psychobiography of the artist (1910).  There will also be a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art Drawings Study Room to view the drawings of Leonardo da Vinci.  Approved for Art History credit. (Fall)

ARH 3005: Feminism and Art History (4 cr.) 

This seminar will survey the history of art from a feminist perspective. It will introduce the student to feminist art historical methodology by focusing on women as subject, model, artist, and viewer. We will examine the way in which feminist art historical criticism has evolved from the 1970s to the present.  Topics will include the female body in art, the dominance of the male gaze, the feminist aesthetic and the position of female artists in the history of art. A 15 page research paper and 15 minute oral presentation is required for this course. (Spring)

Prerequisite: Two art history courses or permission of the instructor.

ARH 3077: Mexican Muralists: Picturing Revolution (4 cr.)

This seminar will offer a comprehensive investigation of the Mexican Mural Movement (1923-1974). A major artistic movement in Latin American culture born in 1920s revolutionary Mexico and culminating in the socially conscious art of the 1960s. The course will primarily focus on the work of the three most prominent Latin American muralists, the so-called Los Tres Grandes: Jos Clemente Orozco (1883-1949), Diego Rivera (1886-1957), and David Alfaro Siqueiros (1896-1974). We will examine their work in both Mexico and the United States. Particular consideration will be given to their important role in the development of 20th century politically conscious art; and to the politics of the 1910 Mexican Revolution. In addition, we will study the work of several other Mexican artists, including Frida Kahlo and Rufino Tamayo. A 15 page research paper and 15 minute oral presentation is required for this course. (Fall)

Prerequisite: Two art history courses or permission of the instructor.

ARH 3080: Seminar for Majors (4 cr.) 

This seminar introduces the professional world of art history, including new methodologies, museum education, museology, gallery and auction house work, graduate study, art patronage, conservation and restoration. Students will have regular writing assignments. Frequent field trips. Open only to Junior and Senior art history majors. Students are urged to consult with the instructor or department chair before registering for this course. (Spring)

Prerequisite: History of Art I and II, and one 3000-level Art History course.

ARH 4495: Independent Study (3 cr.)

Students may undertake a research project with the approval and supervision of a member of the art history faculty.

ARH 4497: Internship (3 cr.)

Museums, galleries, historical societies, auction houses and other cultural institutions in Westchester and New York City offer many opportunities for internships. One day per week of work (or the equivalent), a written journal and overview paper, and the written evaluation of an on-site supervisor are required. (Fall) (Spring)

ARH 5005: Feminism and Art History (4 cr.)

This seminar will survey the history of art from a feminist perspective. It will introduce the student to feminist art historical methodology by focusing on women as subject, model, artist, and viewer. We will examine the way in which feminist art historical criticism has evolved from the 1970s to the present.  Topics will include the female body in art, the dominance of the male gaze, the feminist aesthetic and the position of female artists in the history of art. A 15 page research paper and 15 minute oral presentation is required for this course. (Spring)

ARH 5077: Mexican Muralists: Picturing Revolution (4 cr.)

This seminar will offer a comprehensive investigation of the Mexican Mural Movement (1923-1974). A major artistic movement in Latin American culture born in 1920s revolutionary Mexico and culminating in the socially conscious art of the 1960s. The course will primarily focus on the work of the three most prominent Latin American muralists, the so-called Los Tres Grandes: Jos Clemente Orozco (1883-1949), Diego Rivera (1886-1957), and David Alfaro Siqueiros (1896-1974). We will examine their work in both Mexico and the United States. Particular consideration will be given to their important role in the development of 20th century politically conscious art; and to the politics of the 1910 Mexican Revolution. In addition, we will study the work of several other Mexican artists, including Frida Kahlo and Rufino Tamayo. A 15 page research paper and 15 minute oral presentation is required for this course. (Fall)