Manhattanville Reid Castle In the Spring

Required Courses

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS REQUIRED COURSES
Bachelor of Science Programs (Accelerated)

B.S. IN BEHAVIORAL STUDIES

Prerequisites:

PSY 1004   Fundamentals of Psychology
This course provides an introduction to the science of psychology, including a review of major historical perspectives, methods of research, and contemporary theory and knowledge.  Major areas of study include the biological basis of behavior, emotion and motivation, learning and conditioning, human development, personality, and abnormal behavior.

SOC 1001   Introduction to Sociology
This course provides an overview of the broad scope of the discipline of sociology.  Basic concepts and theories will be discussed, as students are introduced to the major fields of study within sociology.  The sociological perspective, as a useful view of the human condition, will serve as the central theme of the course.

Core Courses:

IDS 3010   Career and Life Work Planning
The course curriculum is designed to serve as an assessment tool re-establishing what a four-year degree means to the students and examining reasons for their returning to college.  The course content emphasizes a liberalizing approach, viewing the adult learner as an ever-growing individual and seeks to incorporate the riches of individual experience with the presentation of new and systematic opportunities for continued learning.  Emphasizing Malcolm Knowles approach to adult learning, the class is an interactive one emphasizing the learner's active participation in the learning process.  Using the textbook "If You Knew Who You Were You Could Be Who You are," by Gerald Sturman, students complete the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a widely recognized career assessment instrument.  Class discussion revolves around their scoring the instrument in such areas as Career Type, Career Anchors, Values, Needs and Internal Barriers.  Through facilitated discussion, the students evaluate career options, develop career goals, and action plans.  Concluding with a home assignment, students use the concepts discussed in class, the completed exercises from the Sturman textbook and their completed MBTI, to write a detailed Personal Career Profile.

BIO 3024   Environmental Science
All plants and animals are connected to one another and to the earth and atmosphere that surround them through an endless chain of relationships.  Participants in this course study some of these relationships and the basic principles of contemporary ecology, including biochemical cycles, homeostasis, tropic levels, population characteristics, and succession.

BIO 3048   The Biology of Health and Illness
Special attention will be given to exploring the roots of our present health care system in nineteenth century institutions; the changing character of relationships between caretakers and ill persons; the importance of metaphoric conceptualizations of bodily and social well-being; the place of illness in social life, the question of medical practice as an "art" or "science"; and the meaning of knowledge, power, and responsibility in healing relationships and institutional contexts.

ENW 3013  Expository Writing
The course focus is two fold: first is the goal of acquiring harp reading comprehension skills through the reading and discussion of some the best modern essays ranging from authors such as Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, and Robert Frost to the more modern essayists such as Brent Staples, Jamaica Kincaid and E.D. Hirsch, Jr.; second is the goal of learning to write clear, logical, smooth, interesting essays free of mechanical errors.  Major emphasis is placed on writing and revising.

PHL 3042   Ethics and Social Responsibility
The focus of this course is on the basic types of ethical problems.  Objectives include:  developing a common language and understanding of ethics, developing analytical skills for identifying and resolving ethical problems, understanding the integral relationship of ethics to organizational performance, recognizing the connection between ethics and leadership and our role as leaders in shaping the communities in which we live.

PSY 3007   Human Development
A survey of developmental psychology from birth through adulthood, with an emphasis on infancy, childhood, and adolescence.  Consideration will be given to developmental theories, to research investigating psychological, social and biological factors and their interactions within a cultural framework.

PSY 3008   Elements of Psychopathology
This course examines the major syndromes of psychological disorders.  Research and theory about the mechanisms, development, and modification of psychopathology are emphasized.

PSY 3043   The Individual and Society
This course presents an overview of social psychology, the study of how people influence one another.  Topics include social perception, social cognition, attitudes, prejudice, attraction, social influence, altruism, aggression, and group behavior.

PSY 3090   Social Statistics
An overview of the logic, skills, and methods used in Social Science research.  Topics include: techniques for organizing and displaying dates (tables and graphs), statistical techniques for describing data, (percentages, averages and variability), and statistical techniques for determining relationships or differences (correlation, probability, tests of differences between performances of groups, and tests of proportionality).

SOC 3010   Family and Society
A consideration of factors in self-understanding and interpersonal relations; changing roles of men, women, and children; problems of family life; socialization of children; the influence of school and community interaction, including parent-teacher relationships; similarities and differences in familial life styles.

SOC 3078   Contemporary Social Issues
An examination of current social issues in America from different and often conflicting perspectives.  Among the issues to be examined are gender and race inequalities in the workplace, the conflict over affirmative action, the debate over health care access, and an appraisal of relevant social policies.

SOC 3090   Social Research Methods
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts and techniques of social research.  Topics will include sampling, survey, case study, interview and questionnaire preparation.  Skill in comparative methods and ethical issues in the practice of research will also be explored.

IDS 3098   Final Integrative Project
This project, carried out under the guidance of a faculty member, requires the student to select and research three topics chosen from the major themes of the program.  The student then prepares a paper that integrates these findings and applies them to a life situation.

B.S. IN COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT

Core Courses:

IDS 3010   Career and Life Work Planning
The course curriculum is designed to serve as an assessment tool re-establishing what a four-year degree means to the students and examining reasons for their returning to college.  The course content emphasizes a liberalizing approach, viewing the adult learner as an ever-growing individual and seeks to incorporate the riches of individual experience with the presentation of new and systematic opportunities for continued learning (Weiland, 1977).  Emphasizing the Malcolm Knowles approach to adult learning, the class is an interactive one emphasizing the learners' active participation in the learning process (Knowles, 1990).  Using the textbook, If You Knew Who You Were You Could Be Who You Are, by Gerald Sturman, students complete the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a widely recognized career assessment instrument.  Class discussion revolves around their scoring the instrument in such areas as Career Type, Career Anchors, Values, Needs and Internal Barriers.  Through facilitated discussion, the students evaluate career options, develop career goals, and action plans.  Concluding with a home assignment, students use the concepts discussed in class, the completed exercises from the Sturman textbook and their completed MBTI, to write a detailed Personal Career Profile.

ENW 3013  Expository Writing
The course focus is two fold: first is the goal of acquiring harp reading comprehension skills through the reading and discussion of some the best modern essays ranging from authors such as Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, and Robert Frost to the more modern essayists such as Brent Staples, Jamaica Kincaid and E.D. Hirsch, Jr.; second is the goal of learning to write clear, logical, smooth, interesting essays free of mechanical errors.  Major emphasis is placed on writing and revising.

COMM/MGT 3032   Understanding the Marketplace and Competition
Students will learn how to conduct basic market research, maximize the return on a marketing budget, evaluate the specific purpose of each marketing activity and measure the response to it, convey any accurate understanding of the customer's needs, make a clear statement of how the product or service meets those needs, distinguish a product or service from competitors' offerings and create a believable message. The course will also explore the basic factors involved in the distribution of products.

COMM/SOC 3050   Mass Media and Society
An examination of the social, political and economic contexts in which American mass media (broadcasters and publishers, advertisers and regulators, among others) and their audiences have developed and operate today. Topics may include: concentration of media ownership and control; the effects of political economy, ideology and organizational structure on news management; the media's role in movements for social change in the U.S. and Third World; personal and political consequences of media practice; and alternatives to the current structure of the media.

COMM 3060   Seminar in Communications and Management Concepts
An overview of the field of communications, oriented towards management applications, this course will begin by covering basic theories and models of communication. After briefly introducing such fields as speech, writing, nonverbal communication and interpersonal, group and corporate communication, the course will examine the use of various media in the service of mass communication. Historical context will be considered in examining media technology from the printing press and publishing to cinema, radio, television and new media such as the Internet. The course will consider professional ethics and the kinds of work in planning, leadership and operations undertaken by managerial professionals in fields of communication including media production, advertising and public relations.

COMM 3061   Oral Presentation and Communication
This course will help students to develop reliable vocal, nonverbal and listening techniques that will result in clear, healthy public presentation and communication. Through the study and oral presentation of formal and informal speeches, debate, work with famous literary texts from Shakespeare to Martin Luther King, and sample business situations, students will practice expression of ideas in a logical, persuasive, well-organized manner and engage in critical, constructive exchange.

COMM/IDS 3062   Written Communications in Media and Management
This overview course gives students ample exposure to the theory and practices of business and managerial communications, beginning with brief consideration of the preparation of effective letters and memos and approaches to the writing of technical documents, manuals, short and medium-length descriptions, proposals and summary reports. Much of the focus of the course will be on writing used in the media and related professions. Journalistic writing in its news, feature and article writing styles will be introduced, from fact gathering to final execution as students carry out writing assignments on topics of current interest. Issues addressed include objectivity and interpretation, ethical issues and effective business practices. Other kinds of writing, including advertising and public relations may be addressed as well.

COMM/IDS 3064   Film and Media Aesthetics and Analysis
This course is an introduction to principles important to critical analysis of cinema and other moving image media such as television and the Internet. Students primarily will view a representative variety of American and foreign films from mainstream and alternative cinematic movements with an eye to understanding and parsing the aesthetic, technical and cultural choices made by filmmakers and by film viewers in their attempts to create and read meaning. The course will cover the techniques, technology and language used by professionals in the fields of moving image communication, and will give students a database of notable images and analyses useful in fields from advertising to media production. This course traces the development of cinema as an art form, a site of political and cultural struggle and as a vehicle for social analysis throughout the 20th century.

COMM 3065   Theories of Communications
An intensive survey of the various fields of communications theory, this course is required before certain upper level courses or major electives may be taken. This capstone course covers in some depth major models and theories of communication, touching on aspects of persuasion, nonverbal communication, interpersonal communication and especially mass media studies. Considerable focus in the course will center on the "process" school of classical mass communications theory and also on the field of semiotics. Case studies for the course will be taken from newspapers, magazine advertising, cinema and television, among other media. The Seminar in Communications and Management Concepts must be taken before registering for this course.

COMM/ART 3066   Multimedia Environments
This course explores effective methods of communicating ideas and information through design and implementation of interactive continuous media projects. Text, drawings, audio, video, images, graphics, animation and other elements are brought together to create powerful communication projects. In addition to some consideration of the history, developmental stages and sweeping paradigm shifts in the communications industry, students will utilize the latest tools and the internet to plan, prototype, produce and deliver multimedia products. A variety of software packages will be used.

COMM 3067   Communications Industries and Information Technologies
Appropriate use of communication and information technologies can facilitate the coordination, control, and management of information. This historical, technological and cultural survey examines the businesses, practices and products that have communicated to mass audiences with the rise of modernity and their impact within the social system. Beginning with some consideration of the impact of the printing press on Western culture, the course moves to consideration of transmitted and telegraphed information before examining some of the key entertainment and informational technologies of the 20th century"cinema, radio and television"and the industries that nourished them. The Behavioral Studies course concludes with an introduction to recent information storage technologies and the Internet and its effects on communication via newsgroups, the World Wide Web and email.

COMM/SOC 3068   Interpersonal and Intercultural Communication
This course is designed to enhance interpersonal and small-group communication skills as well as survey related theoretical foundations. The focus of the course is on verbal and nonverbal forms of human interaction. Issues such as listening, perception, self-concept and self-disclosure, persuasion, leadership, conflict management, cultural difference, relational development and disengagement are explored in theory and practice. Case studies will include a variety of social and multicultural interactions, especially but not exclusively those related to business and management.

COMM 3098   Final Integrative Project
This project, carried out under the guidance of a faculty member, requires the student to select and research three topics chosen from the major themes of the program. The student then prepares a paper that integrates these findings and applies them to a life situation.

B.S. IN ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT

Prerequisites:

MGT 1002   Principles of Accounting I
This course will consider the fundamental principles, concepts, and theory of accounting, as well as their application to business organizations with an emphasis on sole proprietorship and retail business.  The course will cover a full accounting cycle including journals, ledgers, and preparation of financial statements.  A detailed examination will be made of various accounting systems, cash, receivables, inventory valuation, depreciation methods, deferrals and accruals.

ECO 1001   Principles of Economics I:  Introduction to Macroeconomics
This course is an introduction to economic reasoning and macroeconomic theory, with major attention given to inflation, unemployment, monetary and fiscal policy, income policies, and the international sector.

ECO 1002   Principles of Economics II:  Introduction to Microeconomics
This course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory, focusing on consumer demand, cost and the theory of production, the firm in different market conditions, and the functional distribution of income.

Core Courses:

IDS 3010   Career and Life Work Planning
The course curriculum is designed to serve as an assessment tool re-establishing what a four-year degree means to the students and examining reasons for their returning to college.  The course content emphasizes a liberalizing approach, viewing the adult learner as an ever-growing individual and seeks to incorporate the riches of individual experience with the presentation of new and systematic opportunities for continued learning.  Emphasizing Malcolm Knowles approach to adult learning, the class is an interactive one emphasizing the learner's active participation in the learning process.  Using the textbook "If You Knew Who You Were You Could Be Who You are," by Gerald Sturman, students complete the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a widely recognized career assessment instrument.  Class discussion revolves around their scoring the instrument in such areas as Career Type, Career Anchors, Values, Needs and Internal Barriers.  Through facilitated discussion, the students evaluate career options, develop career goals, and action plans.  Concluding with a home assignment, students use the concepts discussed in class, the completed exercises from the Sturman textbook and their completed MBTI, to write a detailed Personal Career Profile.

ENW 3013  Expository Writing
The course focus is two fold: first is the goal of acquiring harp reading comprehension skills through the reading and discussion of some the best modern essays ranging from authors such as Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, and Robert Frost to the more modern essayists such as Brent Staples, Jamaica Kincaid and E.D. Hirsch, Jr.; second is the goal of learning to write clear, logical, smooth, interesting essays free of mechanical errors.  Major emphasis is placed on writing and revising.

FIN 3030   Finance and Planning Process
This course examines key financial statements and their analysis, starting with an accounting process review.  It then introduces the student to the concepts of manufacturing or cost accounting with an examination of cost methods.  Special emphasis is placed upon financial planning and budgeting along with performance measurements and responsibility accounting. Prerequisite:  Principles of Accounting I

IDS 3043   Computers and Computing Applications (Alternate is MGT 3031)
This course provides an overview of the history of computing in the workplace and introduces the student to broad computing concepts and terminology (PC vs. Mid-range vs. Mainframe, Computers / Networks - LAN, WAN and the Internet). From this broad beginning the course focuses on the use of standard office automation tools (Microsoft Office: Word, Excel,  PowerPoint and Access).  The student will learn through hands on training how these tools can build office applications (Access databases, Excel spreadsheets, PowerPoint presentations and Word documents).  

Principles of Management:

MGT 3020   Business Policy
This course deals with the process of formulating and structuring to achieve objectives in organizations.  Students will develop a mission and policies for a company, analyze the external environment and their capabilities for dealing with it, brainstorm possible markets and their competitive advantage for serving those markets, choose a strategy for success, and structure their organization to achieve that strategy.

MGT 3023   Entrepreneurship
This course provides an in-depth study of the elements involved in converting ideas and concepts into a successful business venture.  Topics will include:  the personality of the entrepreneur, developing ideas for entrepreneurial ventures, testing the feasibility of ideas, evaluating the impact on lifestyle, preparation of business and marketing plans, seeking expert advice, securing financing, use of outside professionals, and avoiding pitfalls.

MGT 3031   Economic Forecasting and Decision Making  (Alternate is IDS 3043)
This course gives the student an understanding of the various tools and techniques used in making a scientific forecast and a rational business decision.  Using a real-life problem solving approach, it starts with a study of quantitative methods such as real numbers, algebraic relationships, fractions, and graphs.  This course explores statistical analysis, including concepts, validity testing, and probability and sampling theory.  Research methods, including design and data collection, and quantitative analysis, including classical decision theory are explained. Prerequisite:  Basic Algebra 

MGT 3032  Understanding the Marketplace and Competition
Students will learn how to conduct basic market research, maximize the return on a marketing budget, evaluate the specific purpose of each marketing activity and measure the response to it, convey an accurate understanding of the customer's needs, make a clear statement of how the product or service meets those needs, distinguish a product or service from competitors' offerings and create a believable message.  The course will also explore the basic factors involved in the distribution of products.

SOC 3022   Development and Change in Social Organizations
An historical overview of how social organizations develop and change.  The conflict between the structure and authority of bureaucratic organizations, including the corporate workplace, government, and academe, and the celebration of the entrepreneurial spirit in America culture will be considered.  Research from the social sciences will be used to assess different models of organizational effectiveness.

SOC 3033  Managing Diversity
The increasing diversity in the American workforce and expanding economic interdependence among nations require that managers deal creatively with the cultural dimensions of management.  The course will employ readings and experiential learning to explore and articulate perceptions of difference in order to increase management effectiveness.

IDS 3098  Final Integrative Project
This project, carried out under the guidance of a faculty member, requires the student to select and research three topics chosen from the major themes of the program.  The student then prepares a paper that integrates these findings and applies them to a life situation.